Jerome Rothenberg

Poems and poetics

Toward a poetry and poetics of the Americas (21)

'Lord' Timothy Dexter (1748–1806)

from A PICKLE FOR THE KNOWING ONES; OR PLAIN TRUTHS IN A HOMESPUN DRESS (1848)

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Toward a poetry and poetics of the Americas (20)

Joanna Kitchel, El Niño Fidencio, and Essie Parrish

[In putting together a transnational and historical anthology of the Americas North and South (now in progress), Javier Taboada and I are looking also at founders and representatives of new or revived American-based religions, who speak and write in forms of prophetic and visionary language that resembles what we otherwise would think of as open-verse poetry. In the present instance the outsider poets on display are Joanna Kitchel, a follower of Mother Anne Lee and the Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Coming (a.k.a. Shakers); El Niño Fidencio (Fidencio Constantino Síntora), a mid–twentieth-century healer and cult figure from Mexico; and Essie Parrish, cofounder of the Pomo Indian “dreamer religion” of California. The images above are of Fidencio and Parrish. (J.R.)]

[In putting together a transnational and historical anthology of the Americas North and South (now in progress), Javier Taboada and I are looking also at founders and representatives of new or revived American-based religions, who speak and write in forms of prophetic and visionary language that resembles what we otherwise would think of as open-verse poetry. In the present instance the outsider poets on display are Joanna Kitchel, a follower of Mother Anne Lee and the Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Coming (a.k.a.

'The Mystery of False Attachments'

Now available from Word Palace Press

The following poems are the opening of a series of 140 “fragments” in a new book of mine, The Mystery of False Attachments, set for publication later this month by Word Palace Press in California.

Anne Blonstein

Seven notarikon poems with a note on the process and an essay on the poet by Charles Lock

The following, reprinted from two previous postings on Poems and Poetics, is intended to serve as an early announcement of a symposium on the work of Anne Blonstein (1958–2011) to be held in Buffalo April 17–19, 2020 under the auspices of the SUNY Buffalo Poetry Collection and the Switzerland-based Anne Blonstein Association.

[The following, reprinted from two previous postings on Poems and Poetics, is intended to serve as an early announcement of a symposium on the work of Anne Blonstein (1958–2011) to be held in Buffalo April 17–19, 2020 under the auspices of the SUNY Buffalo Poetry Collection and the Switzerland-based Anne Blonstein Association.

Peter Valente

Introduction and translation of Nerval's essay 'Le Diable Rouge'

[With the help of Henri Delaage (a well-known figure in the nineteenth century among the “initiated” in Paris) and some illustrators (including the famous Nadar, who was a designer before becoming a photographer), Gerard de Nerval composed the journal Le Diable Rouge, which was meant to be a “Cabalistic Almanac for 1850.” Le Diable Rouge inaugurated Nerval’s “Republican” period, the one that would see him, in 1850, publishing in Le National, the great daily organ of the Left.