Articles

Lyn Hejinian (1941–2024): An obituary by Lytle Shaw

Photo by Gloria Graham.

Lyn Hejinian, American poet and essayist, died on Saturday, February 24. Born Carolyn Frances Hall on May 17, 1941, and raised in Berkeley and later Cambridge, Massachusetts, she graduated from Harvard University in 1963.

Lyn Hejinian, American poet and essayist, died on Saturday, February 24. Born Carolyn Frances Hall on May 17, 1941, and raised in Berkeley and later Cambridge, Massachusetts, she graduated from Harvard University in 1963. Her children, Paull and Anna, were born while she was married to the physician John Hejinian.

What we lack in knowing we make up for in syntax

An introduction to new recordings of Larry Price’s poetry

Although broken up by punctuation and performance, Price’s sentences are robustly syntactical — they are faithful to and fanciful with English syntax, and yet they rarely quite “make sense.”

On December 12, 2023, Larry Price visited the Wexler Studio at the Kelly Writers House to record a series of his poems for the PennSound audio archive. This complete recording session, as well as excerpted recordings of each individual poem, can be found HERE at PennSound.

Voices of my desert

An introduction to the Vox Audio collection at PennSound

Acequia Booksellers in New Mexico
Acequia Booksellers in New Mexico

Vox Audio was initiated in 2001 to promote several poets to a possible community interested in such work. The CDs were distributed largely by mail, free of charge. As the name implies, Vox also reflects a regard for voice in poetry – that is, for the kinds of involvement not available from the page, like intonation or subtleties of sound and rhythm that require voicing. 

Vox Audio was initiated in 2001 to promote several poets to a possible community interested in such work. The CDs were distributed largely by mail, free of charge. As the name implies, Vox also reflects a regard for voice in poetry – that is, for the kinds of involvement not available from the page, like intonation or subtleties of sound and rhythm that require voicing. This interest grew from the work of Pound, H.D., and Williams, especially from Williams’ concern with a speech-based poetic and emphasis on contact and locale, what might now be termed context, the dialogic.