Jerome Rothenberg

Jeffrey C. Robinson

'A Big Jewish Book': Subterranean Bible

November 30, 2017, Mitchell Library, Glasgow

 

Mark Weiss

from 'A Suite of Dances,' a new gathering

XIV. Sings Forth

 

The bride of god wants it, now,

on her own terms.

 

We breed cattle

for the final predator.

 

There is always something to ask. This-or-that-ness or

this-or-that-less-ness.

 

Juan Martínez (1933–2007)

Six Poems from 'Angel of Fire,' translated by Sergio Sarano

[The following commentary is taken from the gathering of North and South American poetry (“from origins to present”) that Javier Taboada and I are now preparing and that includes a different poem of Martínez’s, but Sarano’s attempt, as shown here, is the first at a broader range of translation. (J.R.)]

II

David-Baptiste Chirot

'Hidden in plain sight': found visual/sound poetries of feeling eyes and seeing hands

[Himself on the cusp between “outside” and “inside” poetry and art, Chirot, whose work, both verbal and visual, is a great, too-often hidden resource, wrote from an authoritative if barely visible position in contemporary letters. The depth and breadth of his total oeuvre — the rubbings and collages foremost  is outstanding.

Jerome Rothenberg and Sadie Rothenberg

'The Shadow of a Mad King' (1–7)

Poems and Images

a work in progress 

 

(1) 

summoning the sacred voice

of Shelley

Toward a poetry and poetics of the Americas (34)

Diocelina Restrepo, 'What the Great Armadillo Said in Dreams to Me'

Narrated by Diocelina Restrepo, Yukpa People, Sokorpá, Colombia

Assembled and translated by Javier Taboada after Anne Goletz’s research

From Rothenberg and Taboada, the big book of the Americas, now in progress

“our food, the worm

“is among you

“we suffer, for our land has been burned

Toward a poetry and poetics of the Americas (33)

'The Fall of Tenochtitlán,' 1521

The Great Tenochtitlán by Diego Rivera
The Great Tenochtitlán by Diego Rivera

[It’s now the 500th year exactly since the conquest and sacking of the imperial Aztec city of Tenochtitlán by Hernán Cortés and allies, concerning which the following segment from the gathering of “The poetry and poetics of the Americas,” assembled by Javier Taboada and me, as it will appear in the final version.

            A work still in progress.]

 

Patterns of Animus

A new poem by Rochelle Owens

[For some years now, Rochelle Owens has been a regular contributor to Poems and Poetics and,  before that, a key part of the poetry world which many of us have shared with her. Of the power of her work Marjorie Perloff has written: “brilliantly inventive, immensely learned, sophisticated, and witty in its conceits. She is, in many ways, a proto-language poet, her marked ellipses, syntactic oddities, and dense and clashing verbal surfaces.

Episode 2: Sawako Nakayasu

Photo of Sawako Nakayasu reading at a microphone.

Sawako Nakayasu was born in Japan and raised in the US; she has also lived in France and China along the way. Her most recent books are The Ants (Les Figues Press, 2014), and Texture Notes (Letter Machine, 2010), and recent translations include The Collected Poems of Sagawa Chika (Canarium Books, 2015) and Tatsumi Hijikata’s Costume en Face (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2015).

Billie Chernicoff: A Marian Alphabet

[Hers is the extraordinary opening poem in Homage to the Alphabet, an online gathering of poets, published by Metambesen and including individual poems, each using the letters of our or any other alphabet in sequential order. Initiated by master poet Robert Kelly, other contributors include Lila Dunlap, Mikhail Horowitz, Charlotte Mandell, Joel Newberger, Tamas Panitz, Charles Stein, Peter Lamborn Wilson, and Maggie Louisa Zavgren.]

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