Charles Bernstein

Colin Browne on Close Listening

Photo: Charles Bernstein / PennSound

On Close Listening, Colin Browne and I talked about the founding of the Kootenay School of Writing, the limits of narrative in poetry and film and the possibilities of collage, the trickster figure in the work of Charles Edenshaw, and the overlays of personal history and cultural history in Browne’s new book about Edenshaw, a nineteenth-century indegenous artist from British Columbia.

(30:00): MP3

Daphne Marlatt on Close Listening

Photo: Charles Bernstein / PennSound

Daphne Marlatt talks to me about Vancouver as place and theme in her writing, poetry as documentary, the long poem as a fluid form for the lyric, poems as novels and novels as poems, drift in/as double consciousness, verbal language as and in the body, feminist poetics and writing “in lesbian,” the possibilities for love poetry, and the after-effects of her move from Malaysia to Canada when she was nine.

Daphne Marlatt talks to me about Vancouver as place and theme in her writing, poetry as documentary, the long poem as a fluid form for the lyric, poems as novels and novels as poems, drift and double consciousness, verbal language as and in the body, feminist poetics and writing “in lesbian,” the possibilities for love poetry, and the after-effects of her move from Malaysia to Canada when she was nine.

'Look for the Address': Ted Greenwald & me, 1998 interview

© Star Black. October 7, 2008

Ted interviewed me for the Poetry Project Newsletter, part of a series of interviews he did when he was the editor. It was published in the April/May 1998 issue.

Ted Greenwald: What does it feel like to be a poet in the “postmodern” era?

Regis Bonvicino, 'Beyond the Wall: Selected Poems'

Régis Bonvicino is to twenty-first-century São Paulo what Charles Baudelaire was to nineteenth-century Paris: the poet as flaneur wandering through the cultural detritus of our time with mordant gaze and dark wit. Bonvicino’s ebullient poems are replete with philosophically searing perceptions and social conscious lament. Not yet elegy, Bonvicino’s unrelenting acknowledgments center on the parasitic relation between those mangled by society and those doin’ the manglin.’

You can get a hard copy of this new book for $12.95 (or $5 for a PDF) at Green Integer

 

 

Régis Bonvicino is to twenty-first century São Paulo what Charles Baudelaire was to nineteenth-century Paris: the poet as flaneur wandering through the cultural detritus of our time with mordant gaze and dark wit. Bonvicino’s ebullient poems are replete with philosophically searing perceptions and socially conscious lament. Not yet elegy, Bonvicino’s unrelenting acknowledgments center on the parasitic relation between those mangled by society and those doin’ the manglin.’

Tyrone Williams on Close Listening

Photo by Al Filreis

Tyrone Williams talks to me about growing up working-class in Detroit; bookishness and the role of education and his early teachers; assimilation versus resistance and formal innovation in American poetry in relation to his dissertation on “Open and Closed Forms In 20th Century American Poetics”; his practice of “eshuneutics” (after Yoruba spirit Eshu); the use of appropriation in his poetry and the necessity of research and reading beyond one’s immediate knowledge context; and the politics and history of English for African Americans.

Listen to the full show here (44:38): MP3

Tyrone Williams talks to me about growing up working-class in Detroit; bookishness and the role of education and his early teachers; assimilation versus resistance and formal innovation in American poetry in relation to his dissertation on “Open and Closed Forms In 20th Century American Poetics”; his practice of “eshuneutics” (after Yoruba spirit Eshu); the use of appropriation in his poetry and the necessity of research and reading beyond one’s immediate knowledge context; and the politics and history of English for African-Americans.