Charles Bernstein

On N. H. Pritchard, from 'Dark Horses: Poets on Lost Poems' (2004)

My note on N. H. Pritchard was originally published in Dark Horses: Poets on Lost Poems, ed. Joy Katz and  Kevin Prufer (University of Illinois Press, 2004), along with a  poem by Pritchard. Eclipse has now added to its full text versions of both of Pritchard’s books a selection of his periodical and anthology publications. These are also linked at the EPC Digital Library. It is good to see so much more attention to Pritchard’s work than was the case a decade ago. So much of the poetry that captures today's attention is, to use of phrase of Pritchard, quoted by Ishmael Reed, “tangential to thought. His is not.

Why I Am Not a Buddhist, with commentary

[This poem appeared on Poet.Org's "Poem a Day"  on June 25, 2013. The poem remains on the site, but the commentary has been removed.]

Why I Am Not a Buddhist

Reality cons me as it spur(n)s me.
This is the road to eternal
Consanguinity, eloping with
Hope and leaving me to pick
Up the proverbial bag.
But that's the argument for.

My library of poetry magazines -- now at Penn

I donated my collection of literary magazine along with many chapbooks and monographas, to the Penn Rare Books library. These maerials have now been catalogued. (Soon to be added to the collection is the vast inventory Penn acquired from the Gotham Book Mart.) Here are some links:

Ted Greenwald's "Voice Truck," part of Gordon Matta-Clark's Open Space (1972)

reconstruction of a related Matta-Clarke's work

In May 1972, the artist Gordon Matta-Clark installed a dumpster in front of 98 Greene Street in Soho (Manhattan). The work was called both "Open Space" and "Dumpster." The Dumpster was filled with construction debris and other material, formed into three corridors. For Ted Greenwald's contribution to the installation, he created a special audio work. Greenwald installed a tape recorder on the delivery truck for the Village Voice, his long-time day job. Six reels were recorded. One of the tapes, featuring the most dramatic action of the day, was stolen from the cab of the truck: in the middle of Times Square, mounted police galloped up to a subway entrance, tied their horses to the entrance, and ran down into the subway.