Commentaries

Poet's Hardship Fund

Poet's Hardship Fund (UK) is, according to their web site, " a volunteer-run and donation-reliant hardship fund for poets in the UK.":

Jerome Rothenberg

Toward an omnipoetics manifesto and the classics reconsidered

With regard to the teaching and promotion of the ancient Mediterranean “classics,” as reported recently in the New York Times and elsewhere, I’m reminded of the following — partly tongue-in-cheek and partly serious — which I published first in Shaking the Pumpkin (1972) and that Javier Taboada and I are including again in our new hemispheric and omnipoetic anthology of the Americas “from origins to present.” The premise behind it, however, is far

Train a comin': Poems from the Burmese resistance

Zeyar Lynn and Pandora

Zeyar Lynn: To Charles Bernstein

1970s sighting of a 1930s communist poet

Eve Merriam on the front cover of "The Pennsylvania Gazette" in 1978

When writing my books Modernism from Right to Left and Counter-Revolution of the Word: the Conservative Attack on Modern Poetry, 1945-60, I spent a great deal of time studying poets who in the 1930s had joined CPUSA and/or were attracted to the communist movement. And who, I should add, were shunned and even explicitly red-baited in the 1950s.

Electrical currents through language

A poetry workshop

This past summer, I taught a poetry workshop on technology at Literary Arts Center. While the two — poetry and technology — seem disparate, the workshop explored how technology is intimate, poetic and humanized, and how the poetic is technologized. In our digital everyday, language has become even more punctuated and transformed. Exploring literary essays, poetry, technological writing, and technology in our everyday lives, poets wrote speculative poetry and prose poems, made visual poetry, and played with code.

The reading of a poem, a poetry reading, is not a spectacle, nor can it be passively received. It’s an exchange of electrical currents through language Adrienne Rich, “Someone is Writing A Poem”