Richard Foreman

Foreman and Morris at Zinc opening 36th season

photo ©2014 Charles Bernstien / PennSound

RICHARD FOREMAN
Old-Fashioned Prosistutes (43:35) MP3
Foreman read the full script of his recent play at NY's Public Theater.

Richard Foreman: Note on ZOMBOID!

Richard Foreman includes these note to his theater work ZOMBOID! in his new collection from Contra Mundum Press –– Plays with Films, edited by Rainer J. Han­she. Thanks to Contra Mundum and Richard Foreman for permssion to publish this excerpt here. Check out Contra Mundum's other titles, including Nietzsche, Wordsworth, Pessoa, Bates (on negative capability),  and, one I am eager to see, the first substantial translation into English of the great Italian poet Emilio Villa. 

AUTHOR’S NOTES

Notes on my next project, ZOMBOID!

Amongst the many possible strategies
of "spectator oriented" art — two seem to me to stand out. In one style — the spectator is carried on a rollercoaster through various pre-determined emotional focal points. In the second, more meditative style, events are slowed up and relatively detached from each other so the spectator can project his or her own depths, resonating with the presented "material."

Douglas Messerli on Richard Foreman's new play Old Fashioned Prostitutes (A True Romance)

The Unfortunate Truth of My Situation

Richard Foreman Old-Fashioned Prostitutes (A True Romance)

The Public Theater, New York, the performance I attended was on Saturday, May 4, 2013.

After years and years of enigmatic and provocative plays, and after having announced that he was giving up playwriting for filmmaking, Richard Foreman has come back with a new play that at times almost appears to be a kind of film script, Old-Fashioned Prostitutes (A True Romance). Like most of his works, this play is set upon a stage decked out with numerous alphabetical configurations, portraits of “significant” people, numerous odd props, and the strings that outline the horizontal shell of the stage, a kind of mix between a metaphorical representation of string theory and an eruv, the defining territory of the traditional Jewish community that outlines the boundaries through which certain objects can be moved or carried on holy days.

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