Charles Bernstein

The Poems of Osip Mandelstam, tr. Ilya Bernstein (free pdf)

EPC Digital Editions

EPC Digital Editions is pleased to present this new book.

pdf of full book. 

Here is Ilya Bernstein's introduction:

A Note on Mandelstam’s Poems

When Mandelstam wrote, “I never write. I alone in Russia work from the voice,” he was being literal. Here is how Viktor Shklovsky, Mandelstam’s neighbor for a time in the early 1920s, described him: “With his head thrown back, Osip Mandelstam walks around the house. He recites line after line for days on end. The poems are born heavy. Each line separately.” And here is how Sergey Rudakov, a young philologist and poet who visited Mandelstam in exile in Voronezh, described him in 1935: “Mandelstam has a wild way of working… I am standing in front of a working mechanism (or maybe organism, that is more precise) of poetry… The man no longer exists; what exists is – Michelangelo. He sees and remembers nothing. He walks around mumbling: ‘Like a black fern on a green night.’ For four lines, four hundred are uttered, literally… He does not remember his own poems. He repeats himself and, separating out the repetitions, writes what is new.”

Nina Zivancevic's 1983 interview with Charles Bernstein and Douglas Messerli, with a new postscript by Messerli

audio and text

Howard Fox, Charles Bernstein, Douglas Messerli, Doug Lang (r to l)

This interview was first publlished in the Belgrade literary magazine, Knjizevnost, and  in Sagetrieb's  Winter 1984 issue (Vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 63-78).

The undedited audio of the original interview,  from  November 5, 1983,  is avaialbe on PennSound:
(2 hrs, 18min):
MP3

Schjeldahl, Tallman, Dawson, and Thorpe on PennSound

Some new PennSound singles, via Robert Creeley tapes. 

Peter Schjeldahl 
Two readings from the New Yorker art critic, from before he was an art critic. Both readings are from around 1973 and are about 15 minutes each
MP3
MP3 

Warren Tallman
Two essay by the Vancouver critic and key figure for New American Poetry and Tish:
September: A Necessary Politics of Stan Persky, introduction by Robin Blaser (1978) (1 hour): MP3
Treatise on Alcohol (1979) (2 hours): MP3 

Fielding Dawson
Three readings by the Black Mountain-associated fiction writer on  a new PennSound page 

Michael McClure reads to lions

Tantra 49 and 1974 Olson Memorial Lectures at Buffalo

photo by Wallace Berman (I love this image)

Last year City Lights published a new edition of McClure's 1964 Ghost Tantras. This early work of McClure's is composed in a partially invented vocabulary that he calls "best language" (guttaral, expressive), which  brings to mind Khlebnikov's zaum  "Incantation by Laughter" (McCure references Mayakovsky).  McClure wanted to find a level of language that invoked our animality and the recordings he made with lions in 1964 and 1966 remain powerful poetic documents. 

This mp3 is a 1964 reading of "Tantra" 49 from that book; the recording was  made by Bruce Conner.
 (4:07): MP3
 
The better known video, also a reading of "Tantra" 49, is an excerpt from a 1966 episode of Richard O. Moore’s television series U.S.A. Poetry.

Tom Weatherly (Nov. 3, 1942 - July 15 , 2014) on PennSound

cover photo by Elsa Dorfman

PennSound has located a rare sound recording of Tom Weathelry, reading in Grand Valley Michigan in July of 1971. 
(21;07): MP3 
Weatherly reads the complete serial poem "MAUMAU AMERICAN CANTOS" for the first ten minutes of the reading (text here); after that he reads various poems, including “Lady Fox” from Thumprint but nothing else from that book or MAUMAU.

Tom Weatherly -- full texs of these powerful, brilliant, often volatile (and distressingly  unacknowledged) books at Eclipse:
MAUMAU  AMERICAN CANTOS  (Corinth Books, 1970, via Eclipse)
Thumbprint (Telgraph Books, 1971, via Eclpise)