Jerome Rothenberg

Poems and poetics

Peter Minter: 'Everything is Speaking,' a new poem with author's note & biography

PETER MINTER is an Australian poet, poetry editor, and writer on poetry and poetics. His books include the award-winning Empty Texas and blue grass, and his poetry has been widely published and translated internationally, most recently in his book In the Serious Light of Nothing (Chinese University Press Hong Kong, 2013). He was a founding editor of Cordite poetry magazine, coedited the pioneering anthologies Calyx: 30 Contemporary Australian Poets and the Macquarie PEN Anthology of Aboriginal Literature, and has been the poetry editor for leading Australian journals Meanjin and Overland. He shares Aboriginal, Scottish, and English ancestry, and teaches Indigenous Studies, Australian Literature, and Creative Writing at the University of Sydney.

I go to sleep near the infants

breathing bodies, a small herd of nature

in layers of animation, the unknown

unfolding identical powers

delivered through a gateway of hearts

at body temperature. In a nest

of sleeping birds, you’re the bird

you’re the baby, I can hear you dreaming

Gerry Loose: From 'The Great Book of the Woods' (with a note on its sources)

NOTE (by Gerry Loose): The Primer is loosely drawn from the Auraicept na n-Eces, a seventh century CE Old Irish tract known as the Scholars’ Primer or Handbook of the Learned. 

 

It deals with Irish grammar and vernacular, claimed within that book to be descended from speech before the Tower of Babel and more comprehensive than Hebrew, Latin or Greek. The earliest written version we have is from the twelfth century CE, with many additions to the early text.

the primer

 

let profit be gno

let bora be strength

let the duality of the conjugal be ter

let rfoph be veneration

let piety be brops

rihph be cheerfulness

Jerome Rothenberg on 'The Symposium of the Whole'

[The following is a blog post I wrote for the University of California Press to celebrate the expanded fiftieth anniversary edition of Technicians of the Sacred, with an emphasis on its renewed relevance against the upsurge today of still potent nationalisms and racisms, directed most often against the diversity of mind and spirit of which the earlier Technicians was so clearly a part. At least I hope so. (J.R.)]

[The following is a blog post I wrote for the University of California Press to celebrate the expanded fiftieth anniversary edition of Technicians of the Sacred, with an emphasis on its renewed relevance against the upsurge today of still potent nationalisms & racisms, directed most often against the diversity of mind & spirit of which the earlier Technicians was so clearly a part. (J.R.)]

Peter Valente: Fragmentary Improvisations of Yearning

küçük İskender's 'souljam'

introduction.  About a year ago I began discussions with Murat Nemet-Nejat on the subject of contemporary Turkish poetry. From these discussions was born a series of notes, experimental essays, and brief commentaries. The following text is based on a reading of küçük İskender’s souljam (see photo, above), in Murat’s translation, included in Eda: An Anthology of Contemporary Turkish Poetry published by Talisman House in 2004.

[introduction.  About a year ago I began discussions with Murat Nemet-Nejat on the subject of contemporary Turkish poetry. From these discussions was born a series of notes, experimental essays, and brief commentaries. The following text is based on a reading of küçük İskender’s souljam (see photo, above), in Murat’s translation, included in Eda: An Anthology of Contemporary Turkish Poetry published by Talisman House in 2004. k.

Jess’s O! : An unknown masterwork (by Jack Foley)

What do W. C. Fields, the Mona Lisa, an upside down Tarot card, and the capitalized phrase, “GOOD NIGHT, PAPA” have in common? Not much, except that they all grace the cover of an almost unknown masterwork by the San Francisco artist, Jess.

Even is come; and from the dark park, hark.

            — O!   

 

What do W. C. Fields, the Mona Lisa, an upside down Tarot card, and the capitalized phrase, “GOOD NIGHT, PAPA” have in common? Not much, except that they all grace the cover of an almost unknown masterwork by the San Francisco artist, Jess.