Jerome Rothenberg

Poems and poetics

From 'Kojiki': The male deity Izanaki and the female deity Izanami (new edition)

Translated from Japanese by Yoko Danno

[N.B. Yoko Danno’s Songs and Stories of the Kojiki is the first English translation to capture the full sweep & ferocity of the founding Japanese epic.  The work as such was originally published by Ahadada Books in 2008 & has just been reissued by Red Moon Press in Winchester, VA.  Born, raised & educated in Japan, Danno has been writing solely in English for almost forty years.  She continues to live & work in Kobe.]

Clayton Eshleman: 'Wound Interrogation'

[From Penetralia, a new collection of poems, to be published by Black

Widow Press in 2016]

 

In Matta’s “Wound Interrogation,” 

a Malangganesque robot thrusts a flattened palm against

a large pulpy vaginal wound hung before it.

Carol Rubenstein: Four new poems from 'Vanished Number'

AUTHOR'S NOTE.  With a small Saltonstall poetry grant, I visited Auschwitz in 2004-05 during all the seasons.  I had to get the sense of the place on my skin and know at least that reality as it was felt by the inmates.  It was hard to find a way into the overwhelming “pity and terror” of the Auschwitz tragedy, and many poems took on a surreal cast.  I welcomed the variety of approaches that presented themselves.  Some poems, like “Birken, Place of Birches” and “The Carp Feeders,” are based on where and when events occurred.

David Huerta: 'Ayotzinapa,' translated into English by Mark Weiss

[On September 23rd 43 students of the teacher's college in Ayotzinapa, in the state of Guerrero, Mexico, were detained by the police on the way to a protest, and handed over to a local drug cartel. They were tortured and killed, their bodies dismembered, dumped in a pit and incinerated. Mexico has been in turmoil since.

 

David Huerta is one of Mexico's most important poets. This poem is his reaction. (M.W.)]

 

James Koller: Sioux metamorphoses, transcreation after Frances Densmore

[The death of James Koller in December brought with it the memory of his vigorous presence in the years we knew him — at first in Santa Fe, New Mexico, during the initial heady days of ethnopoetics & later with the Franco Beltrametti circle in Switzerland & in his own home & hideaway in the woods of Maine.