Jerome Rothenberg

Poems and poetics

'The Poetry of Osip Mandelstam': A radio play by Paul Celan (complete)

Translated from Celan’s German by Pierre Joris

 

[Reposted as a followup to Pierre Joris’s “Thoughts on Osip Mandelstam’s Birthday,” Jacket2, January 16, 2016.]

 

Four Dada poems with music, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of 'Dada & the Fabled Past'

Performance 1984 of Jerome Rothenberg's That Dada Strain by Luke Morrison & the
Performance 1984 of Jerome Rothenberg's 'That Dada Strain' by Luke Morrison & the Center for Theater Science & Research, San Diego, and New York

Wrote Dada poet Hugo Ball at the moment of discovery (1916): “I have invented a new genre of poems, Verse ohne Worte, (poems without words) or Lautgedichte (sound poems), in which the balance of the vowels is weighed and distributed solely according to the values of the beginning sequence.  I gave a reading of the first one of these poems this evening. I had made myself a special costume for it.  My legs were in a cylinder of shiny blue cardboard, which came up to my hips so that I looked like an obelisk ...

Michael McClure: 'Songheavy (Last Breath Poem)'

SONGHEAVY

    

LAST BREATH POEM

 

After watching human

efforts to save the self-beached

pilot whale at Rockport.

Many times the large dolphin

reversed their efforts and

From 'Technicians of the Sacred' (expanded): Six poems of desperation by worker poet Xu Lizhi

[Originally published in China Labour Bulletin January 6, 2016]

 

I Swallowed an Iron Moon

 

I swallowed an iron moon

they called it a screw

 

I swallowed industrial wastewater and unemployment forms

bent over machines, our youth died young

 

I swallowed labor, I swallowed poverty

swallowed pedestrian bridges, swallowed this rusted-out life

Stephen Ross: 'Question Answers Question: On Ariel Resnikoff's 'Between Shades'' & other matters

Ariel Resnikoff’s poems are wide open steps sunk in whiteness: their imprints lead far beyond themselves. They lead to Krasnystaw and Tel Aviv, Philadelphia and Montreal, antiquity and modernity, and back again. This openness, this generous range, makes Between Shades an unusually companionable book of poems. “I wanted to meet you / to tell you / you didn’t know me” reads the epigraph, summing up the ethics and poetics of this  remarkable debut.