Jerome Rothenberg

Poems and poetics

Stanley Diamond: PRIMITIVE, The Critical Term (redux)

[In the first & heady days of ethnopoetics I was led by Gary Snyder into a close association with the anthropologist Stanley Diamond, a covert poet & a major thinker on the limits & pitfalls of civilization as a state of mind & of governance.  For Diamond, while we all recognized its inadequacy, the term “primitive” remained the defining & necessary counterproposition “to understanding,” as he put it, “our contemporary pathology and possibilities.”  For me at that time the two key essays in his oeuvre were “In Search of the Primitiv

Alana Siegel: From ARCHIPELAGO, “Communion (A Preludium)” and “Afterword”

[NOTE.  Soon to be published by Station Hill of Barrytown, Alana Siegel’s Archipelago adds a new presence & intelligence to a major subset of postmodern American poetry with traceable connections to Duncan’s “grand collage” & Olson’s “composition by field.”  In her own way, which is “a completely different way” (G.

Rochelle Owens: Hermaphropoetics/Longing

Sculpture by Eugen von  Bruenchenhein (1910-1983) as shown in Outsider Art exhib
Sculpture by Eugen von Bruenchenhein (1910-1983) as shown in Outsider Art exhibit at Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2013

In a dream

of a hermaphrodite

in silhouette

slender and elongated

 

a hermaphrodite

shimmering in scene after scene

 

staged and scripted

 

out of a lost narrative

Jerome Rothenberg: Eleven New Books & Publications in 2013

[For the record I will briefly insert the following list of some of my updated book publications, published this year or now awaiting publication.

That Dada Strain (continued): Three Dada Poems with Music (Talking Heads, Noise 292, Ethel Waters)

Performance 1984 of Jerome Rothenberg’s That Dada Strain by Luke Morrison & the
Performance 1984 of Jerome Rothenberg’s That Dada Strain by Luke Morrison & the Center for Theater Science & Research, San Diego and New York

Wrote Dada poet Hugo Ball at the moment of discovery (1916): “I have invented a new genre of poems, Verse ohne Worte, (poems without words) or Lautgedichte (sound poems), in which the balance of the vowels is weighed and distributed solely according to the values of the beginning sequence.  I gave a reading of the first one of these poems this evening. I had made myself a special costume for it.  My legs were in a cylinder of shiny blue cardboard, which came up to my hips so that I looked like an obelisk ...