Jerome Rothenberg

Poems and poetics

American Sign Language as a medium for poetry

 Peter Cook and Kenny Lerner of the Flying Words project performing ASL poetry (
Peter Cook and Kenny Lerner of the Flying Words project performing ASL poetry (Jessica Munyon)

for Joseph Castronovo & Edward S. Klima, in memoriam

[The great breakthrough resulting from a new signing poetry in Deaf Culture has been to call into question a poetics in which orality & sounding are assumed to be the foundational bases of all poetic expression. That revelation goes back three decades & more, recently & notably presented in Signing the Body Poetic: Essays on American Sign Language Literature, ed. by Dirksen L. Bauman, Jennifer L. Nelson, & Heidi M. Rose (University of California Press, 2006).

'Technicians of the Sacred,' revised & expanded: An announcement & an appeal

 [The following is an early announcement of a work now in progress: the latest expanded & revised edition of Technicians of the Sacred that the University of California Press will be publishing in 2017, almost in time for the fiftieth anniversary of the original publication in 1968.  As I launch into the work I’m posting my proposals for the book as an indication of what’s in store & in the hope, as with other assemblages of mine, that others will come forward with suggestions for materials relevant as texts & commentaries that fall along the lines of those in

Ariel Resnikoff, with Jerome Rothenberg: From an interview (continued), on Jews & experimental modernism, with notes toward a poetry of witness & an omnipoetics

Jerome Rothenberg, from a production circa 1984 of "That Dada Strain" by Luke Morrison & the Center for Theater Science & Research, San Diego & Lexington, NY

[The following is a continuation of an interview, the first part of which appeared in Poems and Poetics on December 10. 2014.  The full interview, conducted by Resnikoff over a period of several months, was published later in The Wolf  magazine, number 31, edited by James Byrne & Sandeep Parmar.] 

Jerome Rothenberg: At the Hotel Monopol

PROEM [1988].   It was raining when we got to Wroclaw (Breslau), the miles from Auschwitz bringing back the memories of what had happened there.  Traveling with our son we had made reservations for a single suite at the Hotel Monopol, but when we pulled in, the hotel could only come up with two separate rooms.  After a while, though, the desk clerk said that they had found a suite for us that was free.  An elderly bellhop carried our bags up the central flight of stairs, threw the big doors open, put our bags down on the floor, & asked me with a little smile, “And do you know who slept here?” Then he answered his own question: “Hitler!—And he made a speech from that balcony.”  After which  he turned & closed the doors behind him, leaving us to think again about our fate & theirs.