Charles Bernstein

Amy Sillman & Charles Bernstein, Duplexities

collaborations at Bowery Poetry Club

sometimes a bee’s just a bee
and a sting just a sting
and song just a song
and sorrow just sorrow
sometimes the blue just gets to you
and the black an instrument
of form’s indelible intransigence

October 28, 2011- January 3, 2012
Opening reception, October 28, 5:30 – 7:00 PM
Screening of Pinky’s Rule, Bernstein and Sillman’s 7-minute animated drawing, at 6:15 pm sharp
Bowery Poetry Club
310 Bowery, New York, NY

Penn faculty in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street

As faculty members at the University of Pennsylvania, we wish to express our solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement now underway in our city and elsewhere.

The Capilano Review

Susan Bee & Charles Bernstein in BC early 1970s

Fall 2010 / 3.12
Fall 2010 / 3.12

pdf of issue now available, for $4
Susan Bee: COVER: Light in the Forest, 1973 oil on canvas, 19" x 26"

Andrea Actis. "But sometimes a sign's all you need": A Conversation with Susan Bee & Charles Bernstein

Charles Bernstein, Ruskin (earlier poems)

Susan Bee, In and Around BC: Paintings/Drawings/Sculpture

Beauty Is a Verb: The New Poetry of Disability

introductions & table of contents

edited by Jennifer Bartlett, Michael Northen, Sheila Black — from Cinco Puntos Press

This anthology makes a compelling case for rethinking postwar poetic practice in/through/by the frame of disability.

pdf
:

table of contents
Preface, Jennifer Bartlett
“A Short History of American Disability Poetry,” Michael Northen

from Bartlett's intro:
For me, the idea for Beauty is a Verb can be pinpointed to one single moment, December 10, 2005, the day Norma Cole read at the Bowery Poetry Club for the Segue Reading Series. A few years earlier, after a stroke, Cole lost and regained her ability to speak. Now, she used her temporary aphasia and slurred speech to compose a poem that noted a list of words she could no longer enunciate. The result of her reading this work was alternately hilarious and devastating. Cole laughed at the ridiculous, yet utterly wrenching, situation of a poet losing words, and the audience laughed with her. Yet, it wasn’t as simple as that. Although the audience laughed, they were also visibly uncomfortable. From the sophistication of Cole’s work and her genius as a person, one can guess that this was no accident. Can an entire anthology be sparked by one reading of one poet; I am sure crazier things have happened in this world we called poetry.