Charles Bernstein

Beauty Is a Verb: The New Poetry of Disability

introductions & table of contents

edited by Jennifer Bartlett, Michael Northen, Sheila Black — from Cinco Puntos Press

This anthology makes a compelling case for rethinking postwar poetic practice in/through/by the frame of disability.

pdf
:

table of contents
Preface, Jennifer Bartlett
“A Short History of American Disability Poetry,” Michael Northen

from Bartlett's intro:
For me, the idea for Beauty is a Verb can be pinpointed to one single moment, December 10, 2005, the day Norma Cole read at the Bowery Poetry Club for the Segue Reading Series. A few years earlier, after a stroke, Cole lost and regained her ability to speak. Now, she used her temporary aphasia and slurred speech to compose a poem that noted a list of words she could no longer enunciate. The result of her reading this work was alternately hilarious and devastating. Cole laughed at the ridiculous, yet utterly wrenching, situation of a poet losing words, and the audience laughed with her. Yet, it wasn’t as simple as that. Although the audience laughed, they were also visibly uncomfortable. From the sophistication of Cole’s work and her genius as a person, one can guess that this was no accident. Can an entire anthology be sparked by one reading of one poet; I am sure crazier things have happened in this world we called poetry.

Celebrating Stein in Paris

Gertrude Stein and the Arts  conference
part of the Matisse, Cézanne, Picasso... L’aventure des Stein 
at the Grand Palais in Paris
(same as the "Stein Collects" at SF MoMA) & also coming to the the Met (in NY).

TLS on Susan Howe and Rae Armantrout

David Wheatley, Nobody can bear to watch

TLS
23 September 2011

Susan Howe THAT THIS 112pp. New Directions
Rae Armantrout MONEY SHOT 92pp. Wesleyan University Press

Frank Samperi: Three Books

E-books from PEPC Library

Three books by Frank Samperi: pdf e-books from PEPC library, ©2011 the Samperi Estate and Claudia Samperi-Warren. With thanks to Claudia Samperi-Warren for making them available to PEPC.

The Prefiguration (1971)
Lumen Gloriae (1973)
Day (1998) (transcribed posthumously from 1970 notebook)

From the bio note in Day: Frank Samperi was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1933. Discovered by poet Louis Zukofsky, his first poems were published in the early 1960’s. Through study of Aquinas, Aristotle, Dante and the Hindu Vedantist, Shankaracarya, Samperi created a body of work that was a unique exploration of the ability of language to exist in a pure musicality apart from thingly reference. “Frank’s work was truly abstract, truly resisted the things of the world and boasted rather the refining fire of the spirit,” said Robert Kelly. In his lifetime, he published 20 collections of poetry.

Wiki page with bibliography.