Charles Bernstein

Topsy-Turvy

Please buy the book directly from the publisher, University of Chicago Press, or a local bookstore, including Bridge Street BooksSemCoop, Talking Leaves, Indiebound, McNally-Jackson, and Bookshop.Org. 

176 pages, paper and ebook. Audiobook is from Chicago and Amazon/Aubible.

Charles Bernstein: The Poetry of Idiomatic Insistences

A special issue of boundary 2

Charles Bernstein: The Poetry of Idiomatic Insistences, edited by Paul Bové, focusses, mostly, on international contexts, including forewords to translated editions (translated for the first time), interviews, and a review of Topsy-Turvy.

Erica Hunt: Jump the Clock

The Poetry Project of St. Mark’s Church, in New York, celebrated Erica Hunt’s new selected poems, Jump the Clock, on May 19, 2021 — the first live event at the Project since the onset of the pandemic. 

In my rotting place (PoemTalk #162)

Tuli Kupferberg, 'Morning, Morning' and 'No Deposit, No Return'

LISTEN TO THE SHOW

This episode presents a remarkable — freewheeling, energetic, yet comprehensive — discussion of a remarkable artist, Tuli Kupferberg. It is our first in-person recording in quite a while. Charles Bernstein, Rachel Levitsky, Lee Ann Brown, Pierre Joris, and Al Filreis gathered at the Brooklyn home of Susan Bee and Charles. We considered two works by Tuli: “Morning, Morning,” among the most famous songs performed by The Fugs; and one of Tuli’s spoken-word pieces or “pop poems,” titled “No Deposit, No Return.” The latter is the title cut on an album produced and released in 1966. The album was subtitled “An Evening of Pop Poetry with Tuli Kupferberg.” “Morning, Morning” first appeared as a track on the album entitled The Fugs in March 1966. This song and the entire album, along with liner notes, are available on our Tuli Kupferberg page at PennSound, reproduced with the kind permission of Samara Kupferberg.

'Desafinado': A new translation

On April 16, 2021, Marjorie Perloff brought together Craig Dworkin, Odile Cisneros, Sergio Bessa, and Caetano Veloso for a tribute to Augusto de Campos, as part of the Brooklyn Rails New Social Environment Zoom series. As a tribute to Augusto, who joined the event, I did a new translation of one of the signature songs of bossa nova, “Desafinado.” Augusto had featured the lyric in his 1974 book BALANÇO DA BOSSA e outras bossas (image from this book):

'boundary 2' webinar on 'Topsy-Turvy'

On June 15, boundary 2 editor Paul Bové convened Yunte Huang (from California), Runa Bandyopadhyay (from India), Abigail Lang (from France), and me for b2’s webinar on Topsy-Turvy,  focusing on non-U.S. perspectives, in anticipation of an issue of boundary 2 coming out in the fall. In the b2 issue, Runa gives a Vedic and Bengali spin to her reading of my poetics, Yunte writes about our ongoing mishmash of American and Chinese encounters, and Abigail continues her exploration of American/French poetry exchanges in an introduction to her translation of my work.

Vladimir Feschenko: Charles Bernstein's experimental semiotics

Language poetry between Russian and American traditions

NLO (New Literary Review, Russia), 168:2, 2021

 The new issue of NLO (New Literary Review, Russia, 168:2, 2021) features a section on American poetry edited edited by Vladimir Feschenko. Two of the essays, both machine translated, with some modification, are published here. Please consult the Russian original for accuracy. 

A poem by Tarik Hamdan

Tarik Hamdan, born in 1984, is a Palestinian poet living in Paris.

I translated this poem a year ago for a video from Trimukhi Platform.

A poem by Tarik Hamdan
translated by Charles Bernstein

Steve Clay on Close Listening

Photo: Charles Bernstein / PennSound

Steve Clay and I talk about how he came to start Granary Books on Close Listening. We recorded the show on May 17, 2021. 

(60 minutes): MP3

Listen to 130 interviews and many additional readings at Close Listening and LINEbreak at PennSound.

Russell Atkins on PennSound

Worldd Too Much: The Selected Poetry of Russell Atkins, edited by Kevin Prufer and Robert E. McDonough, was published by the Cleveland State University Poetry Center. Foreword by Janice Lowe. 

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