Reviews

Tangible expressions of a present poetic

A review of E-Poetry 2013 Festival London

Loss Pequeño Glazier, “Four Guillemets”; screen capture/programming: the artist
Loss Pequeño Glazier, “On Four Guillemets”; screen capture.

It is a common misconception that digital media writing is about computers, networks, or any given technology.

Gertrude Stein anew

A review of 'Stanzas in Meditation: The Corrected Edition'

A Gertrude Stein renaissance is afoot. It is difficult not to think how celebrated Stein is, to paraphrase her Stanzas in Meditation.[1]During the past two years, she made a cameo (played by Kathy Bates) in Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris, and several exhibitions of her art collection circulated at major museums.

'Liberation in time of emergency'

On the poetics of Duncan and O'Hara

Most welcome and necessary are these two collections of new essays on the poetry of Robert Duncan and Frank O’Hara, respectively. Poets of literary imagination of the first rank, each has contributed divergent but complimentary perspectives to American poetry of the latter half of the twentieth century. Ezra Pound is daddy to them as much as Gertrude Stein is momma. Play, mirth, and wit with plenty of informal as well as formal reading and study inform the gridwork anchoring the poems and lives of these poets.

A poetry of vision

A review of 'This Constellation Is a Name' by Michael Heller

Michael Heller right. Photo by Lawrence Schwartzwald.
Michael Heller right. Photo by Lawrence Schwartzwald.

Michael Heller’s This Constellation Is A Name: Collected Poems 1965–2010 is a culmination of over forty years of poetic exploration by a major voice in contemporary poetry. From his experimental poems of the 1960s to the more assured (though no less experimental) work of recent decades, Heller’s poems wrestle with all the implications of “history and the constellated night,” as he writes in “Gloss.”[1]  

Typological inquiries

On Lori Anderson Moseman's 'All Steel'

Made up of three sections — “Teaching Tools,” “Labor Pools,” and “Work Cycles” — Lori Anderson Moseman’s All Steel builds a complex series of cause-and-effect-like inquiries. These inquiries are based on a trio of typological metaphors: tool (is to) genre (as) type of worker (is to) building or social space (as) month or holiday (is to) ritual.