Erín Moure

Janky materiality

Poetry is music, and nothing but music. — Amiri Baraka 

Poetry is heard; it is the heard thing. — Erín Moure

Materiality and embodiment

Light filtering through (PoemTalk #132)

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Erin Moure at the Kootenay School of Writing, 2007 — now segmented at PennSound

Thanks to the careful work of PennSound staffer Luisa Healey, Erin Moure’s PennSound page now includes a segmented (by poem and discussion topic) audio recording of Erin’s 2007 reading at the Kootenay School of Writing in Vancouver. Here, for instance, is a six-minute segment on noise and access.

    1. Introduction to O Cidadan (3:01): MP3
    2. Document 15 [from O Cidadan] (2:55): MP3
    3. Document 16 [from O Cidadan] (1:10): MP3
    4. Hazard Non [from O Cidadan] (0:56): MP3
    5. Georgette [from O Cidadan] (0:31): MP3
    6. Document 17 [from O Cidadan] (1:22): MP3
    7. Discussion of O Cidadan and its relation to the discourse of terrorism (3:38): MP3
    8. Introduction to Little Theatres (1:26):MP3

Monster on the 'L'oose

Erín Moure at 'Hot Texts' in 2012

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On February 20, 2012, Erín Moure traveled from Calgary, Alberta, to read at a Belladonna* event, part of the “HOT TEXTS” project. She read with Rachel Levitsky and Christian Hawkey, and was introduced by Emily Skillings. Skillings and Krystal Languell hosted the event, which took place at The Way Station in Prospect Heights Brooklyn. Episode #41 of the PennSound podcasts series, hosted and edited by Emily Harnett, features a twenty-minute excerpt from the reading after a three-minute introduction.

A short interview with Mark Goldstein

Mark Goldstein is the author of three books of poetry published by the award-winning BookThug: Form of Forms (2012); Tracelanguage (2010); and After Rilke (2008).

Burning for peace

In preparation for this week’s commentary, I was flipping through TCR’s recent special issue on multilingualism, and I came across a very interesting essay on translation by Erín Moure. The essay is structured as a kind of journal or daybook recording the process of translating Québecois poet François Turcot’s Mon dinosaure into English. Mouré describes translation not as “bearing across” (get it?!), but as “a poiesis,a making. Each small piece of the Turcot poem, in English, takes hours of building, forming syllables, seeing how they interact.”

Geomantic riposte: 'White Piano'

Nicole Brossard is one of Québec’s leading poets, novelists, and literary theorists, and has published more than thirty books since 1965, including These Our MothersLovhers, Mauve Desert and Baroque at Dawn. Brossard also co-founded La Barre du Jour and La Nouvelle Barre du Jour, two important literary journals in Québec.

Translation's lucky hand

To grasp this amazing book — this doubled and redoubled book — is indeed to hold a lucky hand. To read the words of Hogue and Gallais translating Virginie Lalucq and Jean-Luc Nancy is not just to devour a long poem. It is also to receive a device for reading poetry and for exploring the possibilities of lyric address, for opening spaces in and between two languages, French and English.

Into the Field: Erín Moure with Chus Pato

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Erín Moure is a poet, translator, and communications specialist living in Montreal. She was born and raised in Calgary, and later spent two decades working for the Canadian passenger rail service Via Rail Canada. Erín’s great-grandfather was born in the Galicia region of northwest Spain, and as an adult Erín began visiting Galicia regularly. She picked up the Galician language, and has since written poetry in Galician and translated the work of Galician poets including Chus Pato and Rosalia de Castro.

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