Articles

Wor(l)ds interrupted

The unhistory of the Kari Basin

                                                    … site of massive interruptions    for the most part fatal    first nations  african  asian european life        interrupted  &

Mysticpoetics: Writing the alchemical self in Brenda Hillman's poetry

Brenda Hillman in 1997.

Brenda Hillman’s poetry circumnavigates around the overarching interest of spirit, matter, and everything in between. Even though Hillman’s work is often uncategorizable, she works within a vein that combines traditional lyric as well as more experimental forms. In addition, she incorporates various theologies and esoteric philosophies in her writing. Hillman has said of herself, “I think of myself as a mystic in a practical way.”[1] Hillman blends cultural references, nature, and the spiritual with an open lyric form that leaves room for mystical experiences to occur on the page. Hillman’s poetry can be read as enacting an alchemical process where spirit is turned into matter and matter into spirit.

Vsevolod Nekrasov: Nothing on the page

The more the words, the less the meaning, and how does that profit anyone? — Ecclesiastes 6:11

What does poetry do with language? This question, shouted and shrieked by various avant-gardes of the early twentieth century, became increasingly relevant for Russian poets during the Soviet period. In the 1920s and ’30s, many learned that even as poetry uses words to forge alliances and break windows, words in poetry can also cause serious trouble: they can get you fired or exiled or killed. In the slightly warmer but artistically stifled atmosphere of the mid-1950s, the poet Vsevolod Nekrasov (1934–2009) started asking: what can poetry do for words?

'Invictus' and the negotiated revolution

Or Clint Eastwood's idea of the lyric poem

William Ernest Henley, author of "Invictus."

Queering racialized bodies

Disidentity in the works of Akilah Oliver and Ronaldo Wilson

Isaac Julien. Photo by Sammlung Goetz.

After some time browsing through pages, staring out the window, and drifting over question after question, the idea of the borderlands became something I latched on to despite these unfamiliar cultural experiences and references. It occurred as I repeated the phrase: a vague and undetermined place created by the emotional residue of an unnatural border.

I find myself going back into the past. In absence.

 What haven’t I looked at thus far? What remains

 (mostly) unquestioned in examining what queer

 representations are? Race. Ethnicity. My white skin.

 I must dig deeper.