Commentaries

The Poetry of Osip Mandelstam: A Radio Play by Paul Celan (complete)

Translated from Celan’s German by Pierre Joris

 

[Reposted as a followup to Pierre Joris’s “Thoughts on Osip Mandelstam’s Birthday,” Jacket2, January 16, 2016.]

 

Carolee Schneemann at Segue (three readings)

Three Carolee Schneemann readings in the Segue Series are now available — segmented by poem — at PennSound on our Schneemann author page here. (Thanks to Hannah Judd who did the segmenting).

Twenty-six items from 'Special Collections' (j)

Exhibit 'J': Medieval Icelandic.

Bibliography: The Poetic Edda, translated with an Introduction and Notes by Carolyne Larrington (Oxford University Press, 1996). A few words from Larrington's Introduction: "The Codex Regius, the manuscript in which the Poetic Edda is preserved, is an unprepossessing-looking codex the size of a fat paperback, bound in brown with brownish vellum pages; it is now kept in the Arnamagnæan Institute in Reykjavik. Most of the mythological and heroic poems it contains are only in this single manuscript....

Four Dada poems with music, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of 'Dada & the Fabled Past'

Performance 1984 of Jerome Rothenberg's That Dada Strain by Luke Morrison & the
Performance 1984 of Jerome Rothenberg's 'That Dada Strain' by Luke Morrison & the Center for Theater Science & Research, San Diego, and New York

Wrote Dada poet Hugo Ball at the moment of discovery (1916): “I have invented a new genre of poems, Verse ohne Worte, (poems without words) or Lautgedichte (sound poems), in which the balance of the vowels is weighed and distributed solely according to the values of the beginning sequence.  I gave a reading of the first one of these poems this evening. I had made myself a special costume for it.  My legs were in a cylinder of shiny blue cardboard, which came up to my hips so that I looked like an obelisk ...

You circle around like that restless sound

Carmen McRae

Gertrude Stein wrote at night; Alice Toklas transcribed during the day. In The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, Stein has Toklas observe: “As a matter of fact her handwriting has always been illegible and I am very often able to read it when she is not.”

Some Stein scholars  might tell you that several of her manuscripts appear to be written in both Stein’s and Toklas’ handwriting, which has led to even greater contention and consternation about authorship. But I think I might tell you that just writing something down doesn’t make you the text’s author.