Commentaries

I’ve been in this room before: Astrid Lorange

Astrid Lorange reading at SOd party, Frontyard, September 18, 2016
Astrid Lorange reading at SOd party, Frontyard, September 18, 2016

On a very rainy afternoon on the 18th of September, in a shared art space in Marrickville, Sydney (Frontyard), nine poets read their work: Astrid Lorange, Pam Brown, Alison Coppe, Emily Stewart, Yasmin Heisler, Holly Isemonger, catherine vidler, Dave Drayton and Nick Whittock. The reading was organized by SOd Press, an Australian small press focusing on radical poetics: a press begun by a.j. carruthers and now a collaborative project between myself and him.

Refraction as resistance (ii)

[image: Capone, Cha, Philip, Walker, Kim, Lyle]
Capone, Cha, Philip, Walker, Kim, Lyle

Some artists cannot afford to believe that aesthetics are not inextricably tied to politics. In my final post of the series, I continue summarizing the significance of artists who, in giving expression to their visions of truth and meaning, ultimately resist normative discourses by refracting status quo representations of the world.

This commentary is called Sydney gurlesques, no it's called Stewart and Gomez in performance, no wait

Emily Stewart at the Sydney launch of Knocks (Vagabond Press, 2016)
Emily Stewart at the Sydney launch of Knocks (Vagabond Press, 2016)

Female names dominate the dedications and acknowledgements of Emily Stewart’s book of poems, Knocks (Vagabond Press: 2016). The closing sentence of the acknowledgements section? “girl poets everywhere: this is for you.”[1] To read Stewart is to be in the company of women. The launches of Knocks have so far embodied this sense of a poetry girl gang. In Sydney, it was launched by Pam Brown, with readings by Elena Gomez and Holly Isemonger (August 14, 2016).

Three Previously Unpublished Letters from Antonin Artaud to Colette Thomas

 Translated with a note by Peter Valente

 

TRANSLATOR’S NOTE:

 

Let's take a quick break, actually: Eddie Hopely in performance

Eddie Hopely reading at Sappho's, August 9, photo by Phan Quỳnh Trâm
Eddie Hopely reading at Sappho's, August 9, photo by Phan Quỳnh Trâm

Toby Fitch, following Eddie Hopely’s reading at Sappho’s monthly "Avant Gaga" poetry night (August 9, 2016) described Hopely as “the ultimate troll.” Hopely is this and more. His work is striking for its uncompromising (and potentially self-sabotaging) interrogation of the bodies and frameworks that support/facilitate/provide space for (his) poetry. To edit, publish, stand near (or, for that matter, write on) Hopely’s work, is to risk appearing earnest, naïve and kind of establishment in comparison to his anti-institutional poetics. 

Toby Fitch, following Eddie Hopely’s reading at Sappho’s monthly "Avant Gaga" poetry night (August 9, 2016) described Hopely as “the ultimate troll.”