Commentaries

The lives of the experimental poets 10-12

Stewart, Farrell, Breeze

10. Amanda Stewart 

          unsaidfieldsresonancesnotationsdistinctionsgapsabsencesdisjunctionsbetween

                                                                                         (“vice versa” I/T, p. 23)

Rose Drachler: Three poems with numbers and letters

[Originally published in Burrowing In, Digging Out (1974) and The Choice (1977), both from David Meltzer’s Tree Books. See also the note at bottom of this posting & the essay on Drachler’s work by Christine Meilicke, which appeared as the posting on Poems and Poetics for April 19, 2017.]

 

THE COUNTING MADE THE CORNERS RIGHT

 

The counting made

Poetry across language

Julia Dasbach's letter to Anna

As part of the Poetry Across Languages event organized by Nick Martinez Defina, Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach shared an excerpt from a series exploring language and the meaning of home and reflecting on her own Ukrainian heritage. Held at the Kelly Writers House on April 6, 2017, this event explored translation, language, and identity across borders. 

'TRACTOSAUR' by Amelia Dale

Cover of 'TRACTOSAUR' (Amelia Dale, Troll Thread, 2015)
'TRACTOSAUR' (cover), Amelia Dale, Troll Thread, 2015

A central premise of Amelia Dale’s work is that it is entirely unconcerned with the valence of the work itself. She makes a poem that is a thing before it is a poem, a thing that never wants to be a ‘poem,’ that nevertheless is or gains something when we call it a poem. Here I want to spend some time with Amelia Dale’s 2015 poem TRACTOSAUR, published by Troll Thread in 2015.

A Word doc, for example (the origin of her PDF poems), a file type with a fairly rudimentary and utilitarian purpose, becomes for Dale a playful space in which the poem can extend itself beyond its limits. The format — an electronic file of white rectangular frames/pages with a basic sans serif font and a wonderfully gnarly-looking illustration rendered in MS Paint or similar — gives us a thing that wants to decimate our concept of the poem, of even the illustrated poem.

Christine Meilicke, 'Burrowing In, Digging Out': Digging out Rose Drachler

[EDITOR’S NOTE: Rose Drachler’s virtual disappearance in death is one of those inevitable but disturbing realities that confronts a number of heroic & gifted artists. Her presence in her final years, as Christine Meilicke testifies, was important for many of us — not only the Jewish poets among us, as stressed by Meilicke, but many others as well. John Ashbery wrote of her: “Rose Drachler’s poems are strong and sweet, firm and quirky, but this oddness soon comes to be perceived by the reader as a new canon.”