Commentaries

Beyond Metrical Prosody: Berlin conference

rhythmicalizer. a digital tool to identify free verse prosody

Thanks to Erik Redling and Burkhard Meyer-Sickendiek for organizing Beyond Metrical Prosody: New Rhythms in US and German (Post-) Modern Poetry at Freie Universitat in Berlin. The lively discussion underlined the value of this German-American exchange. I was grateful to learn more about the poetry and short lives of Rolf Dieter Brinkman (1940-1975), as presented by Jan Röhnert, and Rainer Maria Gerhardt (1927-1954), presented by Agnes C. Müller. Brinkman translated O’Hara and Berrigan. Olson and Creeley wrote poems for Gerhardt (recordings on PennSound), the editor of FRAGMENTE, a prescient magazine that included them both:  MP3 -- Olson reading "To Gerhardt, There, Among Europe's Things..." in Berlin in 1966 and MP3: Creeley's 1956 reading of "For Rainer Gerhardt"

Rochelle Owens: 'Devour Not the Elephant'

[N.B. To which she adds, in correspondence: “The elephant is a non-predatory mammal, a sensate being. The poem intersects body and spirit — elephant desire, with the function of marketing, production, distribution and exchange of elephant and rhino body parts by human predators.”]

Poaching scene 

crime scene  carcasses of

dead rhinos and Savannah elephants 

 

Precious the ivory tusks and horns 

cut off  severed

 

Two from a bull

raw and bleeding holes gouged

The reading series

Orchid Tierney

During my tenure as the 2017–18 Price Lab/PennSound fellow, I have had the opportunity to peruse the many MP3 files in the PennSound archive and to consider what inferences and conclusions can be drawn from the relationships between sound, excess, and discard.[1] 

During my tenure as the 2017–18 Price Lab/PennSound fellow, I have had the opportunity to peruse the many MP3 files in the PennSound archive and to consider what inferences and conclusions can be drawn from the relationships between sound, excess, and discard.[1] Discard may seem an unlikely object when staged in relation to sound and, in particular, to the special sonic registers we associate with an audio recording of poetry.

Charles Bernstein = Karl Elektric: Versatorium transcreations, part two

The second volume of translations, transcreations, versions, and extensions of works by New York poet Charles Bernstein by Vienna-based collective Versatorium (coordinated by Peter Waterhouse). The first volume won the Münster International Poetry Prize for best translation in 2015.

Charles Bernstein = Karl Elektric, Gedichte und Übersetzen. Bd. 1.2 

The second volume of translations, transcreations, versions, and extensions of works by New York poet Charles Bernstein by Vienna-based collective Versatorium (coordinated by Peter Waterhouse). The first volume won the Münster International Poetry Prize for best translation in 2015.

Listening out the collectivist window: 'Okay, my name is so-and-so ...'

Here are two facing pages from Rob Fitterman’s This Window Makes Me Feel. Written in the long shadow of 9/11, this book of prose poetry “replaces the individual poet’s response to catastrophe with a collective, multi-vocal chorus of everyday” expression. Parts of the work have been published before, but this Ugly Duckling Presse edition is the first time the whole poem has been printed as one. It is one of the earliest examples of a long poem solely composed with repurposed language taken from the web. We at ModPo will be filming a short video about this excerpt (see below) of Fitterman’s work. I received my copy the other day and cannot stop reading and rereading the sentences.