Commentaries

Jerome Rothenberg

'Bringing the Past into the Present,' fragment of a dialogue with David Antin

[The following, a Spanish translation of which will appear shortly in El Libro de Las Voces, my latest book from Mexico, was an attempt by me and David Antin to start a public correspondence focused on the many years of our friendship and ongoing discourse, from New York in the 1950s to California from the 1970s until David’s death in 2016.

Runa Bandyopadhyay — Bernstein's Jewish Dharmma: An Upanishadic Quantum Poetics

Runa Bandyopadhyay has translated into Bengali, with extended, performative commentary, my essay “The Pataquerical Imperative: Midrashic Antinomianism and the Promise of Bent Studies.” from Pitch of Poetry: “Patquerical Nightshow” in  Ongshumali (W. Bengal / Berlin): 
part onepart two; part three,  part four
and in English: onetwothree, four

Jeffrey C. Robinson: Reconfiguring Romanticism

'Pythia: Commotions, Convulsions, and Shrieks in Keats'

John Keats death mask
John Keats death mask

[The following is the latest installment of Jeffrey Robinson’s ongoing renewal and reimagining of Romanticism and part of his current work in progress: John Keats Utopian Margins. A major Romanticist in his own right, he is the coauthor with me of the third volume of Poems for the Millennium (Romanticism and Postromanticism), a rethinking of the poetic past from the point of view of the present. (J.R.)]

 

Toward a poetry and poetics of the Americas (29)

The woman who went to the village of the dead (Kuikuro)

Kuikuro women dancing during a tolo ritual in the village of Yawalapiti.
Kuikuro women dancing during a tolo ritual in the village of Yawalapiti. Xingu, Brazil, 2005. Photo Carlos Fausto.

Narrated by Ájahi, Kuikuro people

 

Working translation from Kuikuro by Javier Taboada after Bruna Franchetto and Carlos Fausto  

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“I’m going there

Comes by his diasporism honestly

A review of Marmer's 'Cosmic Diaspora'

Norman Finkelstein has published an excellent review of Jake Marmers new book of poems, Cosmic Diaspora. Here’s an excerpt: “Marmer comes by his diasporism honestly, and not only because he is Jewish. ‘Born in the provincial steppes of Ukraine, in a city which was renamed four times in the past hundred years [it was Kirovograd while Marmer was growing up; it is now Kropyvnytskyi]’ (119), Marmer came to the United States at the age of fifteen. ‘Growing up on the outskirts of the universe,’ he tells us, ‘I sought out the language of the cosmos, its imagery and terminology’ (15). A devoted reader of Eastern European science fiction and ‘coveted translations of American sci-fi classics,’ Marmer put this youthful love aside when he became an immigrant — an ‘alien,’ a term to which he became rightfully sensitive.”

 

Norman Finkelstein has published an excellent review of Jake Marmers new book of poems, Cosmic Diaspora. Heres a paragraph:

Marmer comes by his diasporism honestly, and not only because he is Jewish. “Born in the provincial steppes of Ukraine, in a city which was renamed four times in the past hundred years [it was Kirovograd while Marmer was growing up; it is now Kropyvnytskyi]” (119), Marmer came to the United States at the age of fifteen. “Growing up on the outskirts of the universe,” he tells us, “I sought out the language of the cosmos, its imagery and terminology” (15). A devoted reader of Eastern European science fiction and “coveted translations of American sci-fi classics,” Marmer put this youthful love aside when he became an immigrant — an “alien,” a term to which he became rightfully sensitive. His passion was “just too bound up with my old-country self, which I was trying to erase.” His rediscovery of the genre via “Samuel Delaney, Ursula Le Guin, Octavia Butler, and Sun Ra,” led to a renewed vision of “the deep future of the myth, spirit, language, otherness, desire, and the epic.”