Linda Russo

Linda Russo

Poet and Jacket contributor

Linda Russo (from Jacket magazine)
Linda Russo (from Jacket magazine)

Linda Russo currently teaches at the Washington State University. She received her Ph.D. in English from the Poetics Program at the University at Buffalo (SUNY) and her M.F.A. from Emerson College. She has taught creative writing, literature, women's writing, and expository writing. She is a recipient of fellowships from the Ragdale Foundation and the Millay Colony for the Arts, and has given poetry readings in Toronto, Portugal and Cuba. Before coming to WSU, Russo directed Sounds Out, a reading series at the University of Oklahoma. Linda's current publication is «Mirth» from Chax Press, 30/01/2007 - 100 pages:  In MIRTH, New York native Linda Russo "...speaks for and to this 'girl cold' spacetime, in blazes and remedies, with mirth-scholarly and civic, this work divines"--Elizabeth Treadwell. "*Mirth* (read: not 'comedy' nor 'tragedy') is an exhausted Empire's post-urbanity exposed. How much can we afford to guard (or not guard), and how much should we gamble ourselves out to anyone's game on the street. Linda Russo doesn't so much 'experiment' as throw down a viable metrics for every act"--Rodrigo Toscano.

cover of Mirth, by Linda Russo


For many years she has written for Jacket magazine, mainly on issues relating to women and contemporary US poetry. Here are the items she has written, gathered, or compiled for Jacket, with links to each item.

Jacket 7 : Linda Russo: “to be Jack Spicer in a dream” here : Joanne Kyger and the San Francisco Renaissance, 1957-65

Jacket 11: Joanne Kyger Feature, edited by Linda Russo
Linda Russo: Introduction
Joanne Kyger — poem — “Man” from Man/Women
Kevin Killian — The “Carola Letters"
Charlie Vermont — “Form/id/able” and Joanne Kyger
Linda Russo — an interview with Joanne Kyger

Joanne Kyger feature in Jacket 11

Edited by Linda Russo

Joanne Kyger, photo by Bill Berkson, Angel Hair, 1970
Joanne Kyger, photo by Bill Berkson, Angel Hair, 1970

"Peter Orlofsky locks himself in the bathroom all night and smokes opium and then vomits all the next morning so we travel slowly."

Linda Russo: Introduction
Joanne Kyger — poem — “Man” from Man/Women
Kevin Killian — The “Carola Letters"
Charlie Vermont — “Form/id/able” and Joanne Kyger
Linda Russo — an interview with Joanne Kyger

Yard work

Collom, Nguyen, and the domestic

a deer looks up from browsing lawn on Pine Street, Boulder, CO
Deer Yard

In my last post, I referred to an at-homeness the “eco” implies (after the Green root oikos), and to alienated/naturalized binaries, that the errant poetics of Will Alexander might help us rethink. Indeed, the “household” trope is a timeworn frame for ecopoetics, promoted in my own rationale for the journal of the same name: 

“ ‘Eco’ here signals—no more, no less—the house we share with several million other species, our planet Earth. ‘Poetics’ is used as poesis or making, not necessarily to emphasize the critical over the creative act (nor vice versa). Thus: ecopoetics, a house making.” 

When I asked poet Robert Hass where he thought “ecopoetics” got started, he cited Gary Snyder’s Earth House Hold and Wendell Berry’s The Long-Legged House (both published in 1969) as the first notable titles in this area. I don’t know who coined the phrase “household Earth,” but I’m sure Stewart Brand, and his Whole Earth Catalog, had something to do with it—and/or Buckminster Fuller, and/or Gary Snyder, and/or that famous photograph of the Earth from space (1968/ ’72), with astronaut Edgar Mitchell’s comment: “It takes more than a moment to fully realize this is Earth . . . home.”  

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