Kenna O'Rourke

The gifts her ancestors gave

The Women’s March and black erasure

“One marcher from Chicago, Cheryl Thomas-Porter, summed up the communitarian, participatory, and engaged nature of the march in an interview with CNN: ‘This march is us. We made this march. … The march is the contribution of every single woman of African descent.’” Above: marchers gathered on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway on October 25, 1997, for the Million Woman March in Philadelphia.

Feminista Jones opened her speech at the January 21, 2017, Philadelphia Women’s March by reminding the crowd that the erasure of black women’s voices by white feminism is antithetical to feminism itself: “I am a black feminist, and they need to have at least one of them in this space, cause y’all don’t have feminism without us.”

Feminista Jones opened her speech at the January 21, 2017, Philadelphia Women’s March by reminding the crowd that the erasure of black women’s voices by white feminism is antithetical to feminism itself: “I am a black feminist, and they need to have at least one of them in this space, cause y’all don’t have feminism without us.” Jones — a Philadelphia-based activist, social worker, and writer whose work revolves around poverty alleviation, the fight against hunger, sex positivity, and mental health advocacy — had been early to point out that

Voices, lives, and monsters

Kenna O'Rourke

Our first capsule reviews of 2017: Voice’s Daughter of a Heart Yet to Be Born by Anne Waldman, Staying Alive by Laura Sims, and Sympathetic Little Monster by Cameron Awkward-Rich.

Our first capsule reviews of 2017 feature three recent poetry titles.

September picks: Duplan, Szymaszek, and Bartlett

Kenna O'Rourke

2016 titles from Anaïs Duplan, Stacy Szymaszek, and Sarah Bartlett reviewed in brief this month.

Three great 2016 titles from women poets reviewed in brief this month.

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