Al Filreis

Anthology of poems written since 2010

I have guest-edited an issue of the print magazine, Hava La Haba, an independent experimentalist publication based in Tel Aviv — an anthology of fifteen poems by U.S. poets written in the current decade.

ModPo collaborates with the New York Public Library

Press release describes new series of weekly meet-ups for ModPo participants at a branch of the New York Public Library:

http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/penn-prof-al-filreis-host-ny-public-library-inaugural-modpo-mooc-meet

Hudson Park Library

66 Leroy Street (off Seventh Ave. South)
New York, NY 10014-3929
(212) 243-6876

Don't keep score

A few words on Kevin Varrone's forthcoming 'Box Score'

The deep relationship between baseball and language has been remarked many times, but rarely if ever has it been enacted in the writing itself. Kevin Varrone’s Box Score is that enactment. Moment by moment, innings (as it were) of prose poems throw the ultimate linguistic eephus. Play by play wordplay struck by bits of ash verbal industry. No open-field poem can find the strike zone. It must go awry and in doing so presents a perfect game—rare but imaginable, and worth staying ‘til the end.

The poetics of a Jamaica Kincaid sentence

On March 20, 2007 I moderated a public conversation with Jamaica Kincaid. Most of the questions I asked her — and my comments about her writing, after I'd read everything she’d written — were about the convergence of a quasi-cubist idea about sentences (almost Steinian in places, although not quite) on the one hand, and, on the other hand, a specifically postmodern postcolonialist conception of her Caribbean origins. A "trying not to get it quite right," as she and I agreed during the discussion.

We have now posted links to: 1) the video recording of the session; 2) the audio recording of the discussion; 3) the audio recording of the reader she had given the night before; and 4) the audio recording of that reading.

Creeley on Dickinson

Image of Creeley courtesy Francesco Clemente (from a 2002 oil painting); image of Dickinson courtesy Penelope Dullaghan (from a poster she created for the Dickinson Museum in Amherst, MA).

In late September of 1985, Robert Creeley visited New College. He gave three lectures on Emily Dickinson (one each on September 20, 23 and 25) and a reading (September 23), introduced by Aaron Shurin and Duncan McNaughton. We at PennSound have now segmented the first of the three talks by topic. Many thanks to Anna Zalokostas for her superb editorial work. The recordings came to PennSound courtesy of David Levi Strauss. So here are the segments of the first lecture on Dickinson:

  1. challenging the image of Emily Dickinson as eccentric, reactive, and fragile (11:06): MP3
  2. on the comings and goings of the Amherst town and church, her secondary school education, and her daily interactions (10:39): MP3
  3. on her family life (3:34): MP3
  4. reading from Emily Dickinson's letters (8:28): MP3
  5. on the patterns of her friends and family (13:47): MP3
  6. reading from Emily Dickinson's letters (3:19): MP3