Jacket2

Call for papers: Extreme Texts

Jacket2 is seeking short scholarly articles, essays, belletristic documents, creative responses, and ephemera concerned with “Extreme Texts.” This call welcomes writing on, about, and as “Extremity” in its multifarious meanings and implications, from the material to the ideological, from the word’s connotations as “catastrophe” or “limit event” to its denotation as “the farthest point” something can go.

Guest editor Divya Victor is curating a J2 feature on extremity; below, an excerpt from the call, viewable here:

John Ashbery, 1927–2017

Here at Jacket2 we were saddened to learn of John Ashbery’s passing at age 90 this weekend. A prolific and visionary poet, Ashbery has captivated us from the very beginning; few could imagine contemporary poetics without him. Today, we look back at some of our celebrations of Ashbery at JacketJacket2, and PennSound. 

Here at Jacket2 we were saddened to learn of John Ashbery’s passing at age 90 this weekend. A prolific and visionary poet, Ashbery has captivated us from the very beginning; few could imagine contemporary poetics without him. Today, we look back at some of our celebrations of Ashbery at JacketJacket2, and PennSound. 

Our front-page Archive section is currently all-Ashbery; it’s replicated below:

Turn of the century; end of the millennium

A look back at 'Jacket' in 1999

1999 was a great year for Jacket poets, even if it was a bit of a wild year outside. Some sectors speculated that the Y2K bug would spell the end of the Internet — and the end of Jacket by default — but more than that, the last year of the millennium was a time for reflection. It evoked a sense of nostalgia and a near-obligatory need to look back at the figurative footsteps in the sand. Jacket published issues 6–9 that year (January, April, July, and October), so why not take a moment to look back at the poets who were likewise looking back? 

1999 was a great year for Jacket poets, even if it was a bit of a wild year outside. Some sectors speculated that the Y2K bug would spell the end of the Internet — and the end of Jacket by default — but more than that, the last year of the millennium was a time for reflection. It evoked a sense of nostalgia and a near-obligatory need to look back at the figurative footsteps in the sand.

Jacket2 welcomes Divya Victor

Jacket2 is delighted to welcome Divya Victor to our team as our new guest editor. Divya has long been a friend of the journal: she has curated and edited two extraordinary features, “Discourses on Vocality” and “Conceptual writing (plural and global) and other cultural productions” — the latter of which is one of our most massive and ambitious features to date — and written insightfully on her time in Singapore as part of our Commentaries section. She is a prolific poet whose titles include the award-winning Natural Subjects (reviewed here), UNSUBThings to Do with Your MouthSwift Taxidermies 1919–1922Goodbye, John! On John Baldessari, PUNCH, and more.

Jacket2 is delighted to welcome Divya Victor to our team as our new guest editor. Divya has long been a friend of the journal: she has curated and edited two extraordinary features, “Discourses on Vocality” and “Conceptual writing (plural and global) and other cultural productions” — the latter of which is one of our most massive and ambitious features to date — and written insightfully on her time in Singapore as part of our Commentaries section. She is a prolific poet whose titles include the award-winning Natural Subjects (reviewed here), UNSUBThings to Do with Your MouthSwift Taxidermies 1919–1922Goodbye, John! On John Baldessari, PUNCH, and the Partial trilogy, as well as a number of chapbooks.

In memoriam: Richard Swigg (1938–2017)

Richard Swigg in Krakow, 2015.

This weekend we were contacted by Richard Swigg’s daughter, Virginia, who shared the very sad news that her father had passed away a few days earlier after suffering a stroke. PennSound codirector Charles Bernstein has penned a tribute to Swigg for Jacket2, which begins to encapsulate what his herculean efforts meant to us. “Richard Swigg was a great friend of PennSound, editing our extensive sound recording collections of WilliamsBuntingTomlinsonOppen, and Replanksky. His work was thorough, with the aim of archiving all the audio recordings of these poets.”

This weekend we were contacted by Richard Swigg’s daughter, Virginia, who shared the very sad news that her father had passed away a few days earlier after suffering a stroke. PennSound codirector Charles Bernstein has penned a tribute to Swigg for Jacket2, which begins to encapsulate what his herculean efforts meant to us: