Commentaries

Droll/Kolbert Gallery Series (NY) curated by Ted Greenwald (1978-1980)

Ted Greewald by Tom Raworth (2010)

November 2, 1978

Lorenzo Thomas (41:57): MP3

November 16, 1978
Ron Padgett (37:21): MP3

November 30, 1978
Paul Violi (31:40): MP3

December 13, 1979
Michael Brownstein (45:32): MP3

December 20, 1979
Jim Brodey (22:38): MP3

January 25, 1979
Steve Katz (1:02:30): MP3

January 3, 1980
Charles Bernstein (43:31): MP3

January 10, 1980
Maureen Owen (32:21): MP3

January 17, 1980
Charles North (42:09): MP3

Spectacle and ethnicity

Harmony Holiday, The Negro Baseball League (Fence, 2011), 86 pp.—In some of her novels (e.g., Song of Solomon or Paradise), Toni Morrison reconstructs the infra- and super-structures of urban Negro culture after Reconstruction and during Civil Rights legislated integration. The failures of voluntary separatism-cum-Jim Crow segregation which, for Morrison, trump their successes (social and cultural, if not economic or political, independence), are largely, if not exclusively, gender-inflected.

"In truth the subtle web of thought/is like the weaver's fabric wrought"

Image from a 1987 French-English Visual Dictionary, courtesy of Matthew Baird
Image from a 1987 French-English Visual Dictionary, courtesy of Matthew Baird

“Both science and art form in the course of the centuries a human language by which we can speak about the more remote parts of reality, and the coherent sets of concepts as well as the different styles of art are different words or groups of words in this language.” –Werner Heisenberg, Physics and Philosophy (1958)

Will Alexander: from “The Ganges,” excerpt with glossary

[The following is an excerpt from a long poem, “The Ganges,” which runs around a hundred pages & is itself a third of a giant book entitled The Combustion Cycle. The book contains two other poems, “Concerning The Henbane Bird,” & “On Solar Physiology,” the former in the voice of a hummingbird, the Andean Hillstar, &  the latter spoken in the voice of an Angolan shaman. As for “The Ganges,” Alexander tells us, “it pours from the voice of an untouchable.” 

BIG SENSIBLE, introductory remarks on Hannah Weiner's Clairvoyant Journal by Patrick Durgin

for new Bat editions publication

photo by Nelson Howe, c. 1975

Hannah Weiner's Clairvoyant Journal is the last in a series of autobiographical texts. The Fast, Country Girl, Pictures and Early Words, and BIG WORDS precede it. This series begins with her first written account of visionary experiences that would develop over the 1970s, years during which Weiner invented a unique literary form to portray them. The series culminates in this invention.