Commentaries

Robert Sullivan — an important Aotearoa New Zealand poet, editor, and scholar

Robert Sullivan

Robert Sullivan
Robert Sullivan. [Photo by Rachel J. Fenton]

This commentary post features Robert Sullivan (Ngāpuhi and Kāi Tahu iwi). Robert is an important Aotearoa New Zealand poet/author, in that his work flows across several parameters. What do I mean by this?

Kia ora ano [Hello once more].

This commentary post features Robert Sullivan (Ngāpuhi and Kāi Tahu iwi). Robert is an important Aotearoa New Zealand poet/author, in that his work flows across several parameters. What do I mean by this?

Jerome Rothenberg in conversation with Irakli Qolbaia, on the origins of Ethnopoetics, deep image, gematria, and other early matters

Jerome Rothenberg in conversation with Irakli Qolbaia

Reading at Morden Tower, Newcastle, circa 1967, with Tony Harrison (left).
Reading at Morden Tower, Newcastle, circa 1967, with Tony Harrison (left).

[This conversation was carried on between Tbilisi, Georgia, and Encinitas, California in late 2017.  Other work by Irakli Qolbaia can be found here and here on Poems and Poetics.]

[This conversation was carried on between Tbilisi, Georgia, and Encinitas, California in late 2017.  Other work by Irakli Qolbaia can be found here and here on Poems and Poetics.]

 

'A lemon painted yellow'

Amy Stidham

Editorial assistant Amy Stidham returns with three capsule reviews on unexpected drama. Under review: stack by James Davies, Common Place by Sarah Pinder, and Battledore by L. J. Sysko.

stack, James Davies (Carcanet Press, 2017)

Flash fiction/prose poetry in Aotearoa New Zealand

Flash fiction/prose poetry

Flash fiction and prose poetry in Aotearoa New Zealand

Kia ora ano.

The creation of flash fiction/prose poetry is increasing exponentially in Aotearoa, New Zealand. It has always been around, but nowadays there are more exponents, more outlets, more coverage, more academic 'acceptance' of the form. It is a significant presence and — to me — a very valuable and viable method to further  w  i  d  e  n  the horizons of poetry and literature in this country. Which has always been the focus of these commentaries.