Commentaries

A slowing 6: Distillation (toward justice)

There is another world, but it is inside this one. These words serve as a gateway to numerous poetic slowings. Through these words, attributed to Paul Éluard, we move into Suzanne Buffam’s collection of poems The Irrationalist, in which she writes “There is no way to know how many beans are in the jar without removing them one by one” (11).  This image of precision is also one of care, attentive to this world and slowing into it.

Jump

Jumping portrait of Urayoán Noel by ADÁL.  2015.
Jumping portrait of Urayoán Noel by ADÁL. 2015.

Note: Photograph is from the collaborative project Cuerpo del Poema, by Irizelma Robles and ADÁL.

Translations by Urayoán Noel, like his poetry and criticism, are deeply enjoyable.  They announce the presence of a vital mind – insightful, singular and often funny.  Poems bound, spitting energy.  The best part is that even at their most frenetic, the writings emerge out of a long, patient, and illuminating investigation into cultural forms and traditions.

"Exquisitely marginal, folded into place, and revelatory"

Introductory note to a resurgent ecopoetics post-conference ‘Plenary’

“The feral lives among us almost as if it belongs” (331), writes ecocritic Anne Milne in the course of arguing for the value of a feral bioregionalism.

Amslinger, Bernstein, Lange, Lupette, Traxler reading in Berlin, Essen, and Dresden in May 2015 (audio & video)

Essen

Dresden May 13, 2015
Norbert Lange and Charles Bernstein read their collaboration, "Apoplexie/Apoplexie" in Dresden on May 17, 20015 (24:29): MP3This work begins with Bernstein's "You" (from Resistance, 1983) and cotinues with Lange's translation, then Bernstein's translation of Lange's version, over nine rounds (18 poems), written in 2013 and 2014. It will be published later this year in Schreibheft, ed. Norbert Wehr.
(24:29): MP3 

Tuli Kupferberg, '1001 Ways to Beat the Draft'

In 1966, Tuli Kupferberg released the marvelous LP No Deposit / No Return and a long poem called 1001 Ways to Beat the Draft,  written with Robert Bashlow. 1001 Ways to Beat the Draft is one of the great long poems of the New American (and "Beat") poetry --  and perhaps the quintessential 60's anti-war poem, though it is hardly known at all and as far as I know not recognized as a poem.  But it is one and a great one. The full poem (66 pp.) is on-line via Haathi Trust digital library's anarchism pamphlets.

The poem sits somewhere between Allen Ginsberg's "America" (1956) and Ted Berrigan's "Things to Do on Speed" (1970) and brings to mind Phil Och's classic "Draft Dodger Rag" (YouTube) (c. 1965) and Country Joe and the Fish's "I Feel Like I'm Fixin' To Die Rag" (1969)