Commentaries

Jerome Rothenberg in conversation with Irakli Qolbaia, on the origins of Ethnopoetics, deep image, gematria, and other early matters

Jerome Rothenberg in conversation with Irakli Qolbaia

Reading at Morden Tower, Newcastle, circa 1967, with Tony Harrison (left).
Reading at Morden Tower, Newcastle, circa 1967, with Tony Harrison (left).

[This conversation was carried on between Tbilisi, Georgia, and Encinitas, California in late 2017.  Other work by Irakli Qolbaia can be found here and here on Poems and Poetics.]

[This conversation was carried on between Tbilisi, Georgia, and Encinitas, California in late 2017.  Other work by Irakli Qolbaia can be found here and here on Poems and Poetics.]

 

Flash fiction/prose poetry in Aotearoa New Zealand

Flash fiction/prose poetry

Flash fiction and prose poetry in Aotearoa New Zealand

Kia ora ano.

The creation of flash fiction/prose poetry is increasing exponentially in Aotearoa, New Zealand. It has always been around, but nowadays there are more exponents, more outlets, more coverage, more academic 'acceptance' of the form. It is a significant presence and — to me — a very valuable and viable method to further  w  i  d  e  n  the horizons of poetry and literature in this country. Which has always been the focus of these commentaries.

Preface to a book on/as Duchamp's infrathins

The seminar is a convergence of the two entities: right there where Marcel Duchamp’s infrathin space-between-spaces and the students’ own experiments with language meet. Where “The dictatorship of grammar” (#100) is only there to be overthrown. Where “The vibrations from sound, audible yet invisible” (#243) are nonetheless seen. Where the space “Between saying and meaning” (#385) is also known as the classroom. Where one is by design never forced to choose “Between passion and purpose” (#993). As Goldsmith has enjoyed saying to anyone within earshot, the poetry world is more than a half-century behind the visual art world; experiments in painting, sculpture and conceptual art have been doing things that most poets and poetics people have heretofore felt impossible or unnecessary. The term “behind” suggests a competition, but of course it’s not that. It’s not a course (as it were) with a finish line or single endpoint. It’s a means, a movement defying conventional academic evaluation, a way toward fresh conception through educational defamiliarization. The success of the project comes from putting the two worlds aesthetically — and pedagogically — together. Thus will emerge, we expect, a new generation of artists and arts-minded citizens who are actively uninterested in distinctions between the arts; they know it’s all one project.

Every other year Kenneth Goldsmith teaches a year-long seminar on writing about/through contemporary art. The 2017-18 seminar was held as a collaboration of the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing at Penn and the Philadelphia Museum of Art (in particular the Modern division) — and the students created their own version of Duchamp's infrathins. In a few weeks a book containing the students' Duchampian compositions will be published, and it will include the following prefatory statement by me.