Commentaries

a web site that doesn't function as a page

Roderick Coover's hyper-narrative "Voyage into the Unknown" program traces John Wesley Powell's journey down the Colorado River in 1869. River-like, the site moves horizontally rather than vertically. You can take side trips. Etc.

function as form

Jane, who has a fabulous eye for such things, loves this particular view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art just as much as anything hanging from the walls in this corridor. (It's the corridor just outside the Walter & Louise Arensberg modernist art rooms.) The tall white ELEVATOR lettering in contrast to the elaborate elevator doors. As if the entrance to some deco baptistry. Anyway, it surely all gets to count among the artwork there, yes?

NASA's Nazis

Back in the 90s, Linda Hunt (who had been with CNN) was writing a book about all the former Nazi scientists who had then come to the U.S. and worked at NASA. She was particularly irked by the NASA distinguished service award being presented to Arthur Rudolph who later left the country rather than face charges as a Nazi war criminal. I posted her short article about this to my Holocaust site years ago, and just this morning re-read it.

I don't see that Hunt published a book on this but I do find these two articles:

[] Linda Hunt, "U.S. Cover-up of Nazi Scientists" Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. April, 1985. [4]

[] Linda Hunt, Arthur Rudolph of Dora and NASA, Moment 4, 1987 (Yorkshire Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament)

alphabet review

Here's a video of Rachel Blau DuPlessis' statement about Ron Silliman's The Alphabet, which she (with the help of Phillip Barron) prepared for the Silliman celebration earlier this week at the Kelly Writers House. An entry I made a few days ago gives you a little more information about the event and a link to that video.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=3204389&server=vimeo.com&show_tit...
Rachel Blau DuPlessis on Ron Silliman's The Alphabet from Phillip Barron on Vimeo.

Funk talk

Naomi Beckwith considers funk a language. Listen to her 2005 talk, with lots of musical samples. (Don't be put off by the beginning of the recording; the music is too loud at first.) For more about Naomi and the program, click here.