Commentaries - October 2008

issue made of issue

To the controversy caused by Issue #1 (about which I wrote the other day) there have been a flood of responses. Here are two: Amy King and Ron Silliman. Kenny Goldsmith put up a neutral announcement about this on Harriet, the Poetry Foundation blog, and this was followed by scads of response. Rich Villar, among these, writes: "Howard Stern does shock value much more poetically. Yay, I'm not in it! Gonna go write a poem now, thanks." Daniel Nester: "This term -- "poetry community" -- that's an invention for the purposes of this exercise as well, yes?" And Philip Metres: "This is, of course, absolutely hilarious, and a telling expose of us poets who have our google alerts set to our names, thus dragged into the dragnet of this performance of frustrated narcissism. The joke's on us!"

Steve McLaughlin replies: LINK

announcing KWH-TV

Thanks to an anonymous gift that allowed us to acquire state-of-the-art video equipment, we can now easily webcast Writers House events, whatever's going on in the Arts Cafe: readings, seminars, recording sessions, happenings, the whole range. (We've produced webcasts since 1999 - writing.upenn.edu/wh/webcasts - but with the new camera and specially configured computer, we've essentially automated the process.)

In other words, by simply logging in from home or work, you can see LIVE VIDEO of what's happening here. We hope you'll tune in.

The schedule of events we plan to webcast is below. Events at the Writers House generally start on time, or nearly so. We will, at least, be sure to turn on the camera at the appointed start time so that you'll know something will start soon.

To watch a reading or seminar, go to our webcast instructions page: here

If you have Quicktime already installed on your computer, you'll just click "Start webcast" from this page.

Please do let us know if you like what you see or if you have technical questions. You can email us at wh@writing.upenn.edu or call (215) 573-9748.

KWH-TV schedule (all times Eastern Time):

POEMTALK
October 7, 3:30 PM
PoemTalk records episode #15: Lyn Hejinian's "constant change figures," with Al Filreis, Tom Mandel, Bob Perelman, and Rodrigo Toscano.
http://writing.upenn.edu/wh/calendar/1008.php#7.

TOM MOON AND ANTHONY DECURTIS
October 16, 6:00 PM
Music critics Tom Moon and Anthony DeCurtis discuss Moon's book, 1000 RECORDINGS TO HEAR BEFORE YOU DIE.
http://writing.upenn.edu/wh/calendar/1008.php#16.

JIM SHEPARD
October 21, 6:00 PM
Novelist Jim Shepard reads from his work.
http://writing.upenn.edu/wh/calendar/1008.php#21.

ALUMNI SPORTSWRITING PANEL
November 1, 4:30 PM
"Extreme Sportswriting," a discussion with Stefan Fatsis, Buzz Bissinger, & Jon Wertheim, moderated by Stephen Fried.
http://writing.upenn.edu/wh/calendar/1108.html#1

THE NEW YORK POETS
November 4, 1:30 PM
Listen in as Al Filreis and students of English 88 (modern and contemporary poetry) discuss the New York School: Ashbery, O'Hara, Koch and others.
http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/chap800a.html

EMILY DICKINSON WEBINAR
November 10, 7:00 PM
This live, interactive "webinar" led by Al Filreis and Jessica Lowenthal will allow viewers to participate in a discussion of an Emily Dickinson poem via phone and internet. To participate, email wh@writing.upenn.edu
or call (215) 573-9748.
http://writing.upenn.edu/wh/calendar/1108.html#10.

CELEBRATION OF WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS
November 11, 6:00 PM
We'll celebrate the 125th birthday of William Carlos Williams with talks and readings by Sarah Dowling, erica kaufman, Pattie McCarthy, Jena Osman, and Elizabeth Scanlon.
http://writing.upenn.edu/wh/calendar/1108.html#11.

DAVID VON DREHLE & GENE WEINGARTEN
November 12, 6:00 PM
Paul Hendrickson will lead a freewheeling conversation with journalists David Von Drehle and Gene Weingarten.
http://writing.upenn.edu/wh/calendar/1108.html#12.

ASHBERY AND THE NON-NARRATIVE
November 13, 1:30 PM
Listen in as Al Filreis and students of English 88 (modern and contemporary poetry) discuss the poetry of John Ashbery.
http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/chap800a.html

BREYTEN BREYTENBACH
December 4, 6:00 PM
South African poet, painter, essayist, and activist Breyten Breytenbach will read from his work as part of the provost's Writers without Borders series.
http://writing.upenn.edu/wh/calendar/1208.html#4

Belladonna founder coming to Philly

I'm really pleased to announce that this year's CPCW Fellow in Poetics & Poetic Practice is Rachel Levitsky. She will teach a seminar called "Writing Practice of the Avant-Garde or: Avant-Garde Hybrid Writing" and at the Kelly Writers House will host the visits of several writers associated with the course.

Rachel Levitsky's first full-length volume, Under the Sun, was published by Futurepoem books in 2003. She is the author of five chapbooks of poetry, Dearly (a+bend), Dearly 356, Cartographies of Error (Leroy), The Adventures of Yaya and Grace (PotesPoets) and 2(1x1)Portraits (Baksun). Levitsky also writes poetry plays, three of which (one with Camille Roy) have been performed in New York and San Francisco. Levitsky's work has been published in magazines such as Sentence, Fence, The Brooklyn Rail, Global City, The Hat, Skanky Possum, Lungfull! and in the anthology, 19 Lines: A Drawing Center Writing Anthology. She founded Belladonna--an event and publication series for avant-garde poetics--in August 1999. A past fellow of The McDowell Colony and Lower Manhattan Community Council, she teaches at Pratt Institute and lives steps away from The Brooklyn Botanical Gardens.

Previous CPCW Fellows: Tracie Morris, Linh Dinh, Erica Hunt, and Kenneth Goldsmith.

For much more go here. And here's a Ceptuetics interview: AUDIO RECORDING

Below is a video recording of Rachel's reading at Berkeley as part of their lunchtime poets series:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YB0ZsiA9KiE]

yelpers yelp praise

"...a very hip little cottage..." Phrase found among the reviews of the Kelly Writers House currently posted to Yelp.

LINKS: 1 2

there is so much to be scared of so what is the use of bothering to be scared


I send out thanks to Daniel Schwartz, who has pointed out two errors on a web page that I've had up for years - the text of Gertrude Stein's "Reflection on the Atom Bomb." The corrected version is here.

"They may be a little scared, I am not so scared, there is so much to be scared of so what is the use of bothering to be scared, and if you are not scared the atomic bomb is not interesting."