Commentaries

Hannah Weiner's CODE POEMS in City Hall Park (NY)

Hannah Weiner's Code Poems are featured in "The Language of Things," a public art show that opened tonight across from NY's city hall. Here are some photos, by Susan Bee. Adam Pendleton's work is based on Weiner's (photo from the web site).  Weiner's description of the work is provide on the exhibitions web site via EPC (originally published in 0-9).

Collaged correspondences: Alexa Mergen on movement, stillness, & other practices

found sign | collage by Alexa Mergen
found sign | collage by Alexa Mergen

When I was a girl, my father used to set me atop the postal service mailbox located around the corner from our house. Blue and red, with a cavernous mouth that swallowed envelopes into what I imagined to be an enormous steel belly, its steadfast presence signified a mysterious process of reception and delivery — the transport of words to somewhere else.

Of a related process — the carrying over of one word to another — poet and translator Forrest Gander observes a corresponding mystery:

Takahashi Mutsuo: “This World, or the Man of the Boxes,” Dedicated to Joseph Cornell

Translation from Japanese by Jeffrey Angles

 

[This posting was immediately dropped from Jacket2 Commentaries when I first posted it, so I’m reposting it now. (J.R.)]

 

Pilgrim on earth, thy name is heaven,
Stranger, thou art the guest of God.

Mary Baker Eddy

this familiarity with wrong meanings puzzles one

"Weather Warning" by Tom Lee. CC NC-BY. Brighton seafront as shot from the pier.
"Weather Warning" by Tom Lee. CC NC-BY. Brighton seafront as shot from the pier.

I hadn’t planned for this commentary to coincide with the Sussex Poetry Festival, the chief criterion in my dashed-off email to Jessica nearly a year ago being that I put it off until later. But here we are talking about irritation, and anyone who’s been involved in planning a poetry festival knows about that.

At Sussex our union is in a labor dispute with management over eroding real pay against increased workloads, the wage gap for women, and casualization (again: gendered). Basically, although no one has said this, it is a dispute over the “feminization of labor,” the fact that it is now considered not only okay but natural to treat all workers the way it was always considered natural to treat female workers (underpaid, precarious, competition-based, smile required).

We are working to rule (a bad strategy in the summer; we should do it during term-time when our research time is destroyed anyway) and there was some question as to whether we should hold the festival at all.

Caterpillar

“A magazine of the leaf, a gathering of the tribes”

Caterpillar colophon
Caterpillar colophon

Begun in 1966 by Clayton Eshleman as a series of chapbooks by writers such as Jackson MacLow, David Antin, and Louis Zukofsky, Caterpillar Books became Caterpillar: A Gathering of the Tribes (though the subtitle was quickly dropped) in October 1967 when Eshleman realized he “could cover more ground with a literary journal than with undistributable chapbooks.” In a 2008 dialogue in Jacket, Eshleman says that he “wanted to do a magazine based on Cid Corman's Origin, but one that was bigger and more burly, taking on more ‘fronts’ than Cid had engaged.”

Cat 2 tocBegun in 1966 by Clayton Eshleman as a series of chapbooks by writers such as Jackson MacLow, David Antin, and Louis Zukofsky, Caterpillar Books became Caterpillar: A Gathering of the Tribes (though the subtitle was quickly dropped) in October 1967 when Eshleman realized he “could cover more ground with a literary journal than with undistributable chapboo