Dementia Blog

Susan Schultz on genocide and dementia redux

On September 15, 2011, I began my conversation with Susan Schultz by somewhat rudely/unfairly asking her a huge question: "Are you able to associate your interest in genocide [she'd been teaching about the Cambodian genocide] and your interest in dementia and memory loss?"

"These questions are sometimes mind-bending"

Susan M. Schultz & affording entrance

Susan Schultz gets good reception at Carnegie Hall (Pacific University).

Kaia Sand

Not long ago, Susan M. Schultz stood reading poetry before a class of undergraduate psychology majors, who just minutes ago were reviewing episodic memory with their dynamic Memory and the Mind professor, Erica Kleinknect. The students seemed to quickly engage this creative approach to the ideas they were studying. After Schultz read, one young man asked a follow-up question about George Oppen (Schultz had alluded to Oppen earlier). I think he asked about whether traces of Oppen's dementia showed up in his late poetry. A discussion about George Oppen! And in a psychology class! Lovely.

Affording entrance

Rethinking accessibility

Kaia Sand

One evening with Jules and our daughter, Jessi, I wandered a warehouse of open studios near the Willamette River in northeast Portland. We came upon organic chemist David Cordes painting a narrative of organic chemistry and nationalism; a couple operating as florists who sold nothing and displayed no floral arrangements, but urged people to try their homemade sweetbread; and a woman who urged visitors to arrange glass designs from bowls of crushed glass, which she offered to fire in the kiln, with no mention of charge. A startling-lack-of-explicit commerce continued from studio space to studio space. Our last stop of the evening was a space where a tightrope was bolted a foot off the floor.

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