Anselm Hollo

Anselm Hollo, in memoriam podcast

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Anselm Hollo, the widely admired Finnish poet and translator, died on January 29, 2013. He lived in the United States from 1967 until his death. Hollo translated poetry and belles-lettres from Finnish, German, Swedish and French into English. He was one of the early translators of Allen Ginsberg into German and Finnish.  Hollo taught creative writing in eighteen different institutions, among them SUNY Buffalo, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and the University of Colorado at Boulder; and starting in 1985, he taught in the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University.

Anselm Hollo (1934-2013)

Tom Raworth on Hollo in The Independent (obit Jan. 31, 2013)

Anselm Hollo PennSound page
includes a section of The Empress Hotel Poems (1:30): MP3

Go through my things
   god knows what you'll find. When I'm not here.
I'm not here, in this poem
I'm in another room, writing praises
            of their loveliness and terror
the ones that dance through my mind
        not endlessly, but to be one at one
                               with them
                           I want to be.
                       I want to be one,
                   I want her to be one
              when the voice begins
         she is, and she dances.
I am the voice. I praise
There is
no mind.

Jacket 27 Feature: Anne Waldman

Edited by Alan Gilbert and Daron Mueller

Anne Waldman, Berlin 2002 -- Photo by John Tranter
Anne Waldman, Berlin 2002 -- Photo by John Tranter

[»»] Introduction: by Alan Gilbert and Daron Mueller
From the Introduction:
The essays included in this Anne Waldman feature were selected from presentations given at a symposium honoring the University of Michigan Special Collections Library’s acquisition of Anne Waldman’s archive. Entitled “Makeup on Empty Space: A Celebration of Anne Waldman,” the symposium was held at the University of Michigan from March 13–15, 2002. It included over twenty poets, scholars, publishers, and artists participating in both panels and poetry readings. Andrei Codrescu’s “Who’s Afraid of Anne Waldman?” served as the keynote speech for the symposium.
[»»] Maria Damon: Making the World Safe for Poetry (or, How Is Anne Waldman Different from Woodrow Wilson?)
[»»] Rachel Blau DuPlessis: Anne Waldman: Standing Corporeally in One’s Time
[»»] Alan Gilbert: Anne Waldman Changing the Frequency

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